Feds slowly chipping away at College Bribery and Fraud.

Lokest

Junior
Joined
Nov 3, 2015
Messages
2,340
Jeebus, you're right. The sad part is he'll still neg me for this.

Lets not forget about the anti-gun SJW Parkland kid who got rejected everywhere the suddenly was accepted by Harvard when he bitched publicly. It ain't just money that greases the wheels.

Other than prestige, what value do these institutions actually provide? Is the education somehow better? Are they privy to some secret information that nobody else is?
The right people
 

OriginalGatorHater

Sophomore
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
8,417
I had to. I just couldn’t help it. LOL. But you deserved it anyway … dropping the politics in there.

Quick story: an old classmate of mine was rich. His dad, who was worth conservatively 150M 30 years ago, had “pioneered” an area of law in a certain region of the country. So convinced he was of his privilege (having recommendations from a sitting SCOTUS Chief Justice in addition to the biggest entertainer of the day will do that for you) that his law school applications totaled 4 schools, iirc: Harvard, Yale … Georgetown was his safety. He had good scores, he had great grades, but I guess they felt he had too much privilege; that he wasn’t THAT exceptional. He wasn’t accepted. The real ELITES can be that choosy.

His dad pulled him from school in the late spring - he never came back - and he began law school at a very good regional school that fall without ever applying.

The “value” provided by these universities is more extreme than ever, a point hammered home multiple times by @OriginalGatorHater over the last few months. The result for today’s graduates is high-paying career path or demand economy also known as the servant economy: Uber, etc.

How Boomers broke America

“The meritocratic class has mastered the old trick of consolidating wealth and passing privilege along at the expense of other people’s children.”
Very well said brother!
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
31
Just so that I am clear...

Wealthy father who went to Yale (whose wealthy father also went to Yale), making six-figure donations directly to the school to get his otherwise undeserving child admitted as a "legacy" is not "a separate college admissions system for the wealthy."

Wealthy father who did not go to Yale but makes six-figure payments to a third-party "charitable organization" (that isn't really a charitable organization) to get his otherwise undeserving child admitted into Yale as a pseudo-athlete is "a separate college admissions system for the wealthy."

Is that about right?
Pretty much, except I’m pretty sure the organization in scenario B is a “for profit” organization, so it couldn’t really be described as a “charitable organization”.
 

JD08

Freshman
Joined
Dec 19, 2014
Messages
790
I had to. I just couldn’t help it. LOL. But you deserved it anyway … dropping the politics in there.
I knew you would, but it had nothing to do with politics. My point was that Harvard's "standards" can be flexible for various reasons, like virtue signaling. This kid wasn't good enough for any of the others, but Harvard? Did they lower their standards? Well, except for Asians.

Its about everyone being treated fairly, by the same criteria. All anybody wants is a fair chance.
 

Tetragrammaton Cane

Bandwagon Driverless
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Jun 28, 2017
Messages
2,117
I knew you would, but it had nothing to do with politics. My point was that Harvard's "standards" can be flexible for various reasons, like virtue signaling. This kid wasn't good enough for any of the others, but Harvard? Did they lower their standards? Well, except for Asians.

Its about everyone being treated fairly, by the same criteria. All anybody wants is a fair chance.
Stop it. Nobody actually believes in fairness. And the conundrum is between wanting a fair chance and giving others a fair chance. Everyone believes in what’s in it for me and finding an argument to justify it.

But, you’re right, Harvard can use any criteria it wants and it will still have exceptional students. What it wants is a “well-rounded”class and I have no problem with that.
 

Tetragrammaton Cane

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2,117
We'll disagree, but they never were. Always been a myth.
He’s one of those aggrieved, protocultural, identity politics dumbfucks who always add politics where a conversation could be had.
 

JD08

Freshman
Joined
Dec 19, 2014
Messages
790
Stop it. Nobody actually believes in fairness. And the conundrum is between wanting a fair chance and giving others a fair chance. Everyone believes in what’s in it for me and finding an argument to justify it.

But, you’re right, Harvard can use any criteria it wants and it will still have exceptional students. What it wants is a “well-rounded”class and I have no problem with that.
If nobody believes in fairness, then why do we keep trying to legislate it into existence? It's a goal we'll always be chasing because some group will always try to get an advantage.

Oh, and people will justify and rationalize all manner of actions in pursuit if their goals. The problem comes when they try to do that through policy.
 

Tetragrammaton Cane

Bandwagon Driverless
Joined
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Messages
2,117
If nobody believes in fairness, then why do we keep trying to legislate it into existence? It's a goal we'll always be chasing because some group will always try to get an advantage.

Oh, and people will justify and rationalize all manner of actions in pursuit if their goals. The problem comes when they try to do that through policy.
You do see that you answered your own question.
 

OriginalGatorHater

Sophomore
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
8,417
Real talk: how is this different from making a huge donation to a school? (Well, aside from the bribery, etc …)
You are 100% correct. There really is no difference, but the reason they are coming down on them is because they cut out the school making the profit.

When a billionaire drops 30-40 million on buildings for a school over the years and then gets their son accepted. That is one thing. Its between Billionaires and the school. You will never see Frost getting in trouble for his grandaughter getting preferential treatment regarding admissions.

When B list celebs worth 10-20 mill drop 50-100k to some middle man(and the school sees no profit) that is when it gets busted because it is between millionaires, non revenue sports coaches, and some other semi high level people related to the school.
 

CaneOil

Junior
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
2,239
The quick answer is … it is important.

But for me, I don’t care. However, I also don’t care about “bags” for athletes and have no problem at all with student-athletes flagrantly selling themselves to the school that will do the most to get them.

This … is just the reverse.
But would you care if it was your child got pushed out because someone else cheated to get that spot? That's why it's important to send a message to these people. That's just my opinion..
 

CaneOil

Junior
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
2,239
WTF? since when does government get to tell private instiutions how to decide who to admit? If fraud was conducted, that’s a different issue. But colleges are free to admit wealthy people, poor people ... whoever.
Are they really private if they except any tax dollars?
 

prinmemo

Junior
Joined
Jan 1, 2015
Messages
1,735
I had to. I just couldn’t help it. LOL. But you deserved it anyway … dropping the politics in there.

Quick story: an old classmate of mine was rich. His dad, who was worth conservatively 150M 30 years ago, had “pioneered” an area of law in a certain region of the country. So convinced he was of his privilege (having recommendations from a sitting SCOTUS Chief Justice in addition to the biggest entertainer of the day will do that for you) that his law school applications totaled 4 schools, iirc: Harvard, Yale … Georgetown was his safety. He had good scores, he had great grades, but I guess they felt he had too much privilege; that he wasn’t THAT exceptional. He wasn’t accepted. The real ELITES can be that choosy.

His dad pulled him from school in the late spring - he never came back - and he began law school at a very good regional school that fall without ever applying.

The “value” provided by these universities is more extreme than ever, a point hammered home multiple times by @OriginalGatorHater over the last few months. The result for today’s graduates is high-paying career path or demand economy also known as the servant economy: Uber, etc.

How Boomers broke America

“The meritocratic class has mastered the old trick of consolidating wealth and passing privilege along at the expense of other people’s children.”
Letters from important people don’t move the needle. $$$$ does. That’s where your friend’s father fxcked up.
 

db305

doodoo brown
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Messages
2,668
WTF? since when does government get to tell private instiutions how to decide who to admit? If fraud was conducted, that’s a different issue. But colleges are free to admit wealthy people, poor people ... whoever.
the private institutions still receive federal funding and some big names would collapse without that money. the ivy league would be fine, but schools like usc (and um) would be destroyed. same reason why everyone went nuts enforcing title ix to the point of absurdity after the obama admin's "dear colleague" memo went out. that cash is important.
 
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