OT: 75th Anniversary of D-Day

Canedude08

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My great-grandfather served during WWII. Before he died, he once told me the following "Whenever someone tells you about the "Greatest Generation" guard your wallet, and know that you are dealing with a jerk(He used a different word,, but we aren't going to use it here). We weren't the greatest generation. Why? Because it took our children coming along to do something about how people that look like us were treated. I was a part of the arsenal of democracy, but couldn't practice it when the war was over. I fought to keep Nazis from conquering the world, but Nazis(and people that sympathized with them) had more rights in America than I or anyone that looked like me did. I served with people whose families were locked in internment camps, not because they did anything, but because of where their parents were born. I fought not because I loved this country with all my heart but because the alternative was demonstrably worse"

My great-grandfather was pissed when my grandfather went off to West Point, because he came to believe that it was insane for us to continue to fight and die for people that hated us and only conferred upon us our rightfully earned rights only at gunpoint. Then again, my great grandfather also was someone that came to embrace the ideology of Malcolm, because he grew cynical about this country, especially as men he served with were murdered, fighting for their rights AFTER the war.


I appreciate those that stormed those beaches, but the "Greatest Generation" stuff is just mere propaganda. There is no such thing as a greatest generation. There are shitheels and heroes in every generation, and we should be equally grateful to all of those that answered the call.
 
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TheU 4ever

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God bless them ALL! No one can fathom the courage, bravery and valor that these BRAVE soldiers had when they landed on the French Shores on D-Day! Absolutely incredible and beyond words! I will never cease to be amazed. Simply overwhelming LOVE for these HEROES! Thank you many, many times!! Even then, it is not enough!!!!!
 

Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
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Just wanted to take a moment to recognize and observe the sacrifice our grandfathers, grandmothers, brothers and sisters, aunts, uncles, neighbors and friends made this day 75 years ago on the beaches across Normandy, France.

Sacrifice is the word that always comes to mind when I think of this day.


I think its important to remember our shared history - the good, the bad and the heroic.

Thank you to the Greatest Generation.

These men and women did nothing short of save the world for democracy.

Millennials and Gen Z (especially males) could learn so much if only they could put the game controller down for 2 mins.
 

Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
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My great-grandfather served during WWII. Before he died, he once told me the following "Whenever someone tells you about the "Greatest Generation" guard your wallet, and know that you are dealing with a jerk(He used a different word,, but we aren't going to use it here). We weren't the greatest generation. Why? Because it took our children coming along to do something about how people that look like us were treated. I was a part of the arsenal of democracy, but couldn't practice it when the war was over. I fought to keep Nazis from conquering the world, but Nazis(and people that sympathized with them) had more rights in America than I or anyone that looked like me did. I served with people whose families were locked in internment camps, not because they did anything, but because of where their parents were born. I fought not because I loved this country with all my heart but because the alternative was demonstrably worse"

My great-grandfather was pissed when my grandfather went off to West Point, because he came to believe that it was insane for us to continue to fight and die for people that hated us and only conferred upon us our rightfully earned rights only at gunpoint. Then again, my great grandfather also was someone that came to embrace the ideology of Malcolm, because he grew cynical about this country, especially as men he served with were murdered, fighting for their rights AFTER the war.


I appreciate those that stormed those beaches, but the "Greatest Generation" stuff is just mere propaganda. There is no such thing as a greatest generation. There are shitheels and heroes in every generation, and we should be equally grateful to all of those that answered the call.
Wholly disagree while respecting your families service and sacrifice.

Were there problems, ABSOLUTELY, did they start to make great strides, hard fought strides, ABSOLUTELY.

The Red Tails of the Tuskeegee Airmen and Chappie James say hi. Doris Miller is still unloading a steel curtain of AA into the sky defending his shipmates. 442d RCT saw heroism equal to any unit.

If those folks don't represent the best of the greatest generation, I don't know who possibly could.

Again, the basis of judging someone based on their tan is disgusting amd awful, but EVERY CULTURE has skeletons in the closet of shame. We van cherry pick going back to the dawn of civilization and very harshly condemn what was considered "normal" or "right" back in their day.
 
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For_The_U

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Not sure what fairy tale you are thinking about. We live and dealt with the unfinished business of WWII. Spent our lives under the threat of nuclear destruction, fighting and winning the Cold War against USSR. While part of the cause of the social and political unrest since the 60’s, living though all of it was hardly an joy ride. Those of us who saw Nam, knew betrayal that our fathers never had to.

Our parents defeated the National Socialists, Fascist Italy and Imperial Japan with resounding bravery and elan which makes them worthy of the title, The Greatest Generation. They saved the world. We freed it from fear of the monster that effort left behind, USSR. The challenge of the next will be surviving and defeating China and the continued menance of radical Islam. That should suffice to provide the youngsters a chance for glory also.

Today is one that screams to the world, that WE are the greatest nation ever. The unselfish good we have done is far more than the bad we have at time inflicted. We counquered all, set them free and then protected them ever since. D Day is a singular event that shows our worth. Those young Americans, Brits and Canadians face evil and kicked its ass.
excellent post.
 
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Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
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Running on to that beach took massive balls of steel. I can't even comprehend what they must have been going through.

Forever grateful.
People should really do this.

Go to Normandy on 6 June at low tide at dawn. Stand at water's edge and look across the 200-300 YARDS of flat sandy beach to the seawall at the base of Arromanches.

Now, imagine significant obstacles and a constant stream of machine gun fire from concrete pill boxes and bunkers.

Add 40lbs of gear and be seasick.

Ready. Set. Go. Make it to the seawall.

It's a f[]cking miracle ANYONE survived on Omaha Beach.

Not tough enough? Go to Pont Du Hoc, look STRAIGHT UP, and climb a rope while the enemy drops grenades and bullets on you.
 

UMFarArcher

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Disagree. Many people my age would not volunteer to go fight for this country. Most do not feel pride for it or the ideals it represents. There are large swaths that would, but those who wouldn’t would not be looked down upon as they were then. Actually, there’s many that would look down upon those who would go fight. That started in the vietnam era. You don’t have to agree with the war, but you can’t alienate those who have volunteered to fight.

You normally don't sign up to fight for your country. You sign up to go kill some folks doing things you don't like being done. Some call it serving your country - but that's not exactly it. Everyone has their own reasons - but you'll find a ****load of your age that would sign up if they felt they had a good reason.

There's always been those who look down on soldiers - in every army in every nation, in every century. It didn't start in Vietnam - although here in the US it was absolutely terrible how our soldiers were treated.

I was dressed a bit different than most soldiers as I was SF, and thus stuck out a bit. But I'd sit in a waiting room - and people would get up, move, and stand up as far away from me as they could. Rather stand than sit near me. In restaurants - I'd be seated - and other patrons would ask to be moved. I've been hitching a ride in a TDY station - and a car or truck would veer off the road like they were going to hit me.

You'd be surprised at how many would rally if a real threat to the US/family/state was manifested. Even in our Revolutionary War, only some 3% to 5% actually did any fighting.

That's true in many wars. Only a small percentage take up arms - it can take forty or more folks back home to keep one soldier in the field and supplied.

We'll be alright. Our 3% are rough as a cob - and better than most other nations 25%. Fact.
 
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Everyone in today’s culture could use a dose of reality from those brave men and women who faced hardships very few of us could fathom.

God bless them and God Bless America
Totally agree but how would they be able to match them? They are to busy on their phones. God bless America is right. Nice post
 

Twhizman

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Every generation that followed that generation needs to be grateful for they have done for us.they answered the call when they were needed the most knowing that some of them wouldn't come back.the freedom we enjoy today we owe to them.
 

Canedude08

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Wholly disagree while respecting your families service and sacrifice.

Were there problems, ABSOLUTELY, did they start to make great strides, hard fought strides, ABSOLUTELY.

The Red Tails of the Tuskeegee Airmen and Chappie James say hi. Doris Miller is still unloading a steel curtain of AA into the sky defending his shipmates. 442d RCT saw heroism equal to any unit.

If those folks don't represent the best of the greatest generation, I don't know who possibly could.

Again, the basis of judging someone based on their tan is disgusting amd awful, but EVERY CULTURE has skeletons in the closet of shame. We van cherry pick going back to the dawn of civilization and very harshly condemn what was considered "normal" or "right" back in their day.
It took damn near another TWENTY years after the end of WWII before we saw the first major significant legislative successes in regards to civil rights. It took almost FOUR decades before people were willing to admit what we did to Japanese-Americans during WWII was unacceptable. Let that settle in. Those brave men and women of color that you mentioned came home and waited another two decades before they could say with a straight face the US Government gave enough of a damn to grant them the rights, codified in law that former Nazis had the MOMENT they got off the boat in 1945.

Yes, we had made some progress following WWII, but it was glacial, which shows that underneath all the self-promotion, a lot of people in the Greatest Generation were no different than their fathers that had fought in The Great War. One can respect the sacrifice made by veterans, while not completely absolving them of their role in keeping men and women they fought beside in a state of second class citizenship.
 

UMFarArcher

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It took damn near another TWENTY years after the end of WWII before we saw the first major significant legislative successes in regards to civil rights. It took almost FOUR decades before people were willing to admit what we did to Japanese-Americans during WWII was unacceptable. Let that settle in. Those brave men and women of color that you mentioned came home and waited another two decades before they could say with a straight face the US Government gave enough of a damn to grant them the rights, codified in law that former Nazis had the MOMENT they got off the boat in 1945.

Yes, we had made some progress following WWII, but it was glacial, which shows that underneath all the self-promotion, a lot of people in the Greatest Generation were no different than their fathers that had fought in The Great War. One can respect the sacrifice made by veterans, while not completely absolving them of their role in keeping men and women they fought beside in a state of second class citizenship.
Hindsight is always so easy and clear, isn't it?
 

Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
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It took damn near another TWENTY years after the end of WWII before we saw the first major significant legislative successes in regards to civil rights. It took almost FOUR decades before people were willing to admit what we did to Japanese-Americans during WWII was unacceptable. Let that settle in. Those brave men and women of color that you mentioned came home and waited another two decades before they could say with a straight face the US Government gave enough of a damn to grant them the rights, codified in law that former Nazis had the MOMENT they got off the boat in 1945.

Yes, we had made some progress following WWII, but it was glacial, which shows that underneath all the self-promotion, a lot of people in the Greatest Generation were no different than their fathers that had fought in The Great War. One can respect the sacrifice made by veterans, while not completely absolving them of their role in keeping men and women they fought beside in a state of second class citizenship.
Don't disagree. Deeply flawed individuals in one aspect and do great things in another--all why helping and hurting the same people along the way.

The pace of change and equality (as if thats needs to be a thing--shameful) was far too slow.
 

Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
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Messages
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It took damn near another TWENTY years after the end of WWII before we saw the first major significant legislative successes in regards to civil rights. It took almost FOUR decades before people were willing to admit what we did to Japanese-Americans during WWII was unacceptable. Let that settle in. Those brave men and women of color that you mentioned came home and waited another two decades before they could say with a straight face the US Government gave enough of a damn to grant them the rights, codified in law that former Nazis had the MOMENT they got off the boat in 1945.

Yes, we had made some progress following WWII, but it was glacial, which shows that underneath all the self-promotion, a lot of people in the Greatest Generation were no different than their fathers that had fought in The Great War. One can respect the sacrifice made by veterans, while not completely absolving them of their role in keeping men and women they fought beside in a state of second class citizenship.
I would also add how many thousand of years did it take to end arrainged marriages? Allow women to speak, let alone have actual seat at table in society? The list goes on and on from the cradle of civilization.
 

Canedude08

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Hindsight is always so easy and clear, isn't it?

Blowing people that had the gall to say that they were the arsenal of democracy, while then sitting there and denying those who had shared those hardships, that had fought and died alongside them the ability to practice it is complete garbage. I know a lot of people love to live in this fairy tale land of "The good old days", but for most of us, it wasn't good. It was tolerable at best. Yes, it could have been worse, but that doesn't mean it's something to aspire to.

Again, one can respect the people who fought, while also saying that the "Greatest Generation" tag is undeserved. Honestly, I don't think the Greatest Generation tag should apply to any generation, because as long as we don't fully perform in word and deed what this country should be about, we are doing our fellow citizens a disservice. We should be doing better, but as long as people can rely on cheap patriotism, the people who benefit from the current arrangement will continue to fleece all of us.
 

JD08

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People love to find fault in historical figures and then make excuses for contemporary ones just as flawed because they have the right letter after their name.
 
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