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2022 SS/RHP Nazier Mule on his commitment to UM

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Zach Shashoua

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Nazier Mule is a 2022 SS/RHP and has recently committed to Miami to play baseball. Nazier is from Paterson, New Jersey, and attends Passaic Co Tech.

The versatile ball player can play pitcher and shortstop and will continue that role at Miami. At his most recent Perfect Game Showcase, Nazier’s fastball gunned in at 96 MPH.

“I could always improve on every aspect of my game. I’ve been working every day; I’ve been working on hitting it the other way, staying sharp in the field, and increasing my velocity. My goal is to throw 100 MPH,” Nazier said.

Nazier recently committed to Miami and has already developed great relationships with the coaching staff.

“When I was talking with the coaches at Miami I was very thankful for the opportunity they gave me to play in their program,” Nazier said. “The coaches are nice guys and it’s a great school. The brotherhood there is also really special.”

One of the major factors that contributed to his commitment was the coaching staff’s ability to develop and take care of their players.

“One of the most intriguing things about Miami is how the coaches handle their players. They care for their players on and off the field. We are already developing a great relationship even though I haven’t even played a game for them yet,” Nazier said.

Perfect Game has given Nazier a grade of 10, which means that he has the potential to be a very high draft pick and/or an elite-level college prospect. But the grind doesn’t stop there; Nazier continues to put in work and improve every day.

“I’m going in as a two-way guy, so I hope to succeed all-around and not just on one side of the ball,” Nazier said. “I’m going to bring hard work every day. I can’t guarantee I’ll throw a perfect game or hit a home run every game, but I will bring my work ethic, attitude, and the ability to never give up.”

 

Allabouttheu95

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This is huge. These kids in north east are 1000x more developed and polished compared to the south Florida superstars we sign year in and year out. Would like more kids from up there. Lopez has done an excellent job of branching out recruiting to north east according to my family who is super plugged in NY.
 

puertorricane

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This is huge. These kids in north east are 1000x more developed and polished compared to the south Florida superstars we sign year in and year out. Would like more kids from up there. Lopez has done an excellent job of branching out recruiting to north east according to my family who is super plugged in NY.

How are they more developed when they play a lot less baseball yearly.
 

Allabouttheu95

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How are they more developed when they play a lot less baseball yearly.
That’s the most fascinating part. I don’t get it either. The players down here have more raw potential but it doesn’t mean they are better players going into college. Also the weather thing is overrated with these indoor facilities up there.
 
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BP Joe

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Very very low chance he ever makes it to campus, but doesn't hurt to stack chips in case.
I agree, as long as we have the Palmquist and CDC types also being recruited just as hard. You'll get lucky occasionally, but look how we struggled when there was no apparent Plan B during Coach Morris' last few years.
 

Allabouttheu95

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I am not so sure about it
And this is exactly what is said about our prospects. The raw potential is there to showcase their full potential in big leagues. They are not as polished in the little things coming out of high school. Just look at how dumb our teams “baseball iq” has been for decades. I’m just telling you what they tell me. They run an absolute baseball factory out of the capitol region in New York and have connections to every major program in the country.
 
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And this is exactly what is said about our prospects. The raw potential is there to showcase their full potential in big leagues. They are not as polished in the little things coming out of high school. Just look at how dumb our teams “baseball iq” has been for decades. I’m just telling you what they tell me. They run an absolute baseball factory out of the capitol district in New York and have connections to every major program in the country.
So even though the data shows that the most players in the MLB are coming from the southern part of the country, you still think they're not as 'ready' coming out of high school?

Does that even make sense? Besides who is 'they' when you talk about what you're being told?
 

Allabouttheu95

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So even though the data shows that the most players in the MLB are coming from the southern part of the country, you still think they're not as 'ready' coming out of high school?

Does that even make sense? Besides who is 'they' when you talk about what you're being told?
A group of individuals that run one of the best travel programs in the country out of the north east. Multiple first round draft picks in last few years including a couple top 15 picks out of high school. Has a very good relationship with lopez. Lopez has put more of an emphasis on recruiting the north east, signed 2 kids out of Ny this cycle.
 

BP Joe

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If we can get more money into the program, I hope we use it like Bama, i.e. find the loopholes to pay consultants, etc. to coach them on certain skills such as defense and base-running. There's only so much a head coach and one assistant can do in modern times w all the other obligations.
 

NC_Canes_11

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If we can get more money into the program, I hope we use it like Bama, i.e. find the loopholes to pay consultants, etc. to coach them on certain skills such as defense and base-running. There's only so much a head coach and one assistant can do in modern times w all the other obligations.
They should pass the third paid assistant thing they were trying to vote on the past couple years. It’s ridiculous that a team with a roster as big as baseball, only has two paid coaches.
 

AquinasStatGuy

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So even though the data shows that the most players in the MLB are coming from the southern part of the country, you still think they're not as 'ready' coming out of high school?

Does that even make sense? Besides who is 'they' when you talk about what you're being told?

The problem isn't "the south", the problem is south Florida. It's all about the swag and the look and being able to launch a 70 mph fastball into the trees at a Perfect Game showcase event. Guys in south Florida don't understand the game well enough to succeed when someone is actually trying to get you out. But when coach is laying belt high BP pitches in there? That's when we see the "talent".

Things like hitting behind a runner or knowing situational baserunning aren't emphasized in the south Florida travel ball landscape. It's all about getting your innings and ABs for the scouts to see you.
 

Number1CanesFan

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If we can get more money into the program, I hope we use it like Bama, i.e. find the loopholes to pay consultants, etc. to coach them on certain skills such as defense and base-running. There's only so much a head coach and one assistant can do in modern times w all the other obligations.
I disagree. I learned absolutely nothing playing D-1 college baseball. Why? Because my high school coach taught me everything I know about the game. He played AAA baseball as a catcher. He tought us things about playing the game that they weren't even teaching in college. His son Jeff Clement played college ball at USC. He broke Mark McGwire's single season USC homerun record. Clement hit 75 homeruns in high school. A national record to this day. He was drafted in the 1st round (#3 overall) by Seattle and played 4 years in MLB before retiring due to injuries. He was a catcher like his dad.

So, it's not about the number of coaches. It's about getting your message to the players and then holding them accountable to how they execute what you want them to do. If we made the base running blunders we've seen with this team, you'd be sitting on the bench the next inning no matter what. Do what we teach you or sit. My high school team was a machine. We were very disciplined in every detail. You had to wear your hat a certain way. We sprinted on and off the field. If one person was jogging, the coach made us run back to the field and sprint in again. We did this in game and in practice. Our practices only lasted not much more than an hour during the season because nobody walked and stations were set up that everyone rotated every few minutes. That's the way my coach ran his program. I'm not saying that's how every program needs to be run. You have to be an effective communicator and hold kids accountable. Then you have predictable success.
 
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The problem isn't "the south", the problem is south Florida. It's all about the swag and the look and being able to launch a 70 mph fastball into the trees at a Perfect Game showcase event. Guys in south Florida don't understand the game well enough to succeed when someone is actually trying to get you out. But when coach is laying belt high BP pitches in there? That's when we see the "talent".

Things like hitting behind a runner or knowing situational baserunning aren't emphasized in the south Florida travel ball landscape. It's all about getting your innings and ABs for the scouts to see you.
Look I understand where you guys are coming from, however it's ironic that all the scouts I've ever met in my life know Florida is a hotbed, period. I u derstabd your S. Florida comments, but what exactly is the debate here anyway?

I don't disregard what is going on in the northeast by any means. Iean you have Cooperstown, The Yankees, the Red Sox are in the region, and damned near every kid that plays baseball can't wait to be old enough to play at Cooperstown in the Summer. It's just the argument that Northeastern kids are more prepared coming out of high school is just another guy's opinion with very little support. Now if you want to simply compare all of the talent that has came out of South Florida vs, say, Jersey...in the last 10yrs, now that would be interesting, but to throw a blanket over it and just use a general statement is crazy.

At the end of the day, a top prospect is a top prospect is a top prospect, and any guy would be an idiot to not recognize a talent like this Mule kid, especially in an era where parents think re-classing their kid is a good idea. This guy is a year younger than most in his class and he's still the best, very exciting player.

This biggest problem I have with travel baseball is that if you just so happen to be as talented as a kid like this, but your parents can't afford the showcase events, you have to hope you have someone in your circle that will promote you, because to agree a little with your argument, most college coaches are lazy as hell when it comes to recruiting...and Perfect Game, PBR, etc are largely to blame. It has its pros and cons, it just sucks a little for the lower income folks.
 

AquinasStatGuy

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Look I understand where you guys are coming from, however it's ironic that all the scouts I've ever met in my life know Florida is a hotbed, period. I u derstabd your S. Florida comments, but what exactly is the debate here anyway?

I don't disregard what is going on in the northeast by any means. Iean you have Cooperstown, The Yankees, the Red Sox are in the region, and damned near every kid that plays baseball can't wait to be old enough to play at Cooperstown in the Summer. It's just the argument that Northeastern kids are more prepared coming out of high school is just another guy's opinion with very little support. Now if you want to simply compare all of the talent that has came out of South Florida vs, say, Jersey...in the last 10yrs, now that would be interesting, but to throw a blanket over it and just use a general statement is crazy.

At the end of the day, a top prospect is a top prospect is a top prospect, and any guy would be an idiot to not recognize a talent like this Mule kid, especially in an era where parents think re-classing their kid is a good idea. This guy is a year younger than most in his class and he's still the best, very exciting player.

This biggest problem I have with travel baseball is that if you just so happen to be as talented as a kid like this, but your parents can't afford the showcase events, you have to hope you have someone in your circle that will promote you, because to agree a little with your argument, most college coaches are lazy as hell when it comes to recruiting...and Perfect Game, PBR, etc are largely to blame. It has its pros and cons, it just sucks a little for the lower income folks.

South Florida is absolutely a hotbed for talent. And major league franchises believe they can turn that talent into contributors at the highest level. But time is a luxury we don't have. Our goal is to win. Now. And we only have 3, maybe 4 years with a guy. MLB teams know that they can develop that guy over 3-4 years where winning and losing doesn't mean a thing. If a guy doesn't know how to run bases, they develop that guy because it is his full time job. If that kid comes to Miami, we lose games because he doesn't know how to run bases.

And, sadly, we're not very good at developing those young players, at least mentally. And youth coaches in south Florida certainly aren't making the job any easier by turning baseball into a glorified home run derby.
 

AquinasStatGuy

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I u derstabd your S. Florida comments, but what exactly is the debate here anyway?

Just to focus on this question...the debate is whether or not raw south Florida talent is capable of beating lesser talent that has a stronger baseball acumen. Take Virginia Tech for example. They have a bunch of guys from Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania. They don't finish in the top 40 of anyone's recruiting rankings. But they come in and take a series from us and our top ranked talent. That happens way too often and is why we missed the tournament for two years. We find a way to lose to Pitt, Maine, Rutgers, Dartmouth, etc.
 

Allabouttheu95

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Just to focus on this question...the debate is whether or not raw south Florida talent is capable of beating lesser talent that has a stronger baseball acumen. Take Virginia Tech for example. They have a bunch of guys from Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania. They don't finish in the top 40 of anyone's recruiting rankings. But they come in and take a series from us and our top ranked talent. That happens way too often and is why we missed the tournament for two years. We find a way to lose to Pitt, Maine, Rutgers, Dartmouth, etc.
Nailed it. Able to articulate it far better than I could. Family member of mine is major league scout and he lives at the U scouting our guys but he says word for word what you said here “South Florida is absolutely a hotbed for talent. And major league franchises believe they can turn that talent into contributors at the highest level. But time is a luxury we don't have. MLB teams know that they can develop that guy over 3-4 years where winning and losing doesn't mean a thing. If a guy doesn't know how to run bases, they develop that guy because it is his full time job. If that kid comes to Miami, we lose games because he doesn't know how to run bases”
 

RedSquare

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I disagree. I learned absolutely nothing playing D-1 college baseball. Why? Because my high school coach taught me everything I know about the game. He played AAA baseball as a catcher. He tought us things about playing the game that they weren't even teaching in college. His son Jeff Clement played college ball at USC. He broke Mark McGwire's single season USC homerun record. Clement hit 75 homeruns in high school. A national record to this day. He was drafted in the 1st round (#3 overall) by Seattle and played 4 years in MLB before retiring due to injuries. He was a catcher like his dad.

So, it's not about the number of coaches. It's about getting your message to the players and then holding them accountable to how they execute what you want them to do. If we made the base running blunders we've seen with this team, you'd be sitting on the bench the next inning no matter what. Do what we teach you or sit. My high school team was a machine. We were very disciplined in every detail. You had to wear your hat a certain way. We sprinted on and off the field. If one person was jogging, the coach made us run back to the field and sprint in again. We did this in game and in practice. Our practices only lasted not much more than an hour during the season because nobody walked and stations were set up that everyone rotated every few minutes. That's the way my coach ran his program. I'm not saying that's how every program needs to be run. You have to be an effective communicator and hold kids accountable. Then you have predictable success.

this.

some of the best coaching ... and this goes for baseball, football, lacrosse, hockey, etc. .... can be found at the HS level.

what you said is a great example.
 
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