X vs Z receiver

yeaman

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#1
Can some football heads on here help me with this? Why do we play Ahmmon into the boundary as an X receiver vs. Cager who is the flanker? Does Ahmmon get more targets at X because the throws are shorter? Or does he face more 1 on 1 coverage at X? Any insight would be appreciated. TIA
 
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#2
Can some football heads on here help me with this? Why do we play Ahmmon into the boundary as an X receiver vs. Cager who is the flanker? Does Ahmmon get more targets at X because the throws are shorter? Or does he face more 1 on 1 coverage at X? Any insight would be appreciated. TIA
More 1 on 1 usually, and lined up weak side compared to strong side with TE or slot. Majority of the best corners are boundary, with less safety help so he is good enough to win 1v1. Also, the X is more of a big play WR i.e. Moss, Megatron, etc. Z is more possession theoretically in the mold of Boldin, Hines Ward types.
 
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#4
Can some football heads on here help me with this? Why do we play Ahmmon into the boundary as an X receiver vs. Cager who is the flanker? Does Ahmmon get more targets at X because the throws are shorter? Or does he face more 1 on 1 coverage at X? Any insight would be appreciated. TIA
The X receiver normally lines up on the line of scrimmage, meaning in most formations he won't be able to go in motion as he's keeping the TE eligible by staying on the line. The X is normally the #1 WR, as this player is the one who will be facing press coverage the most, so must be strong to get off the bump, but then have the speed to separate along the entire route tree.

In a 3 WR set both are on the line of scrimmage. Really there isn't much difference between either, but the #1 WR on a team is normally the X because they face press more often.
 
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#5
The X receiver normally lines up on the line of scrimmage, meaning in most formations he won't be able to go in motion as he's keeping the TE eligible by staying on the line.
The TE would actually be ineligible given your description, He'd be covered up by the X.
 

Arehel

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#6
Can some football heads on here help me with this? Why do we play Ahmmon into the boundary as an X receiver vs. Cager who is the flanker? Does Ahmmon get more targets at X because the throws are shorter? Or does he face more 1 on 1 coverage at X? Any insight would be appreciated. TIA
You’ve answered you’re own question for the most part.
Z is mainly a deep ball or in breaking routes.
X as you said shorter throws and more 1v1.
 
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#7
Usually boundary corners are less athletic than field corners, so maybe the thinking is that Richards creates a mismatch on the short side.
 
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#8
The TE would actually be ineligible given your description, He'd be covered up by the X.
No, the X is on the line and must stay on the line (in most formations) to keep the TE eligible. Not to put you down, but that’s just football 101.
 

yeaman

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#9
More 1 on 1 usually, and lined up weak side compared to strong side with TE or slot. Majority of the best corners are boundary, with less safety help so he is good enough to win 1v1. Also, the X is more of a big play WR i.e. Moss, Megatron, etc. Z is more possession theoretically in the mold of Boldin, Hines Ward types.

Do you expect Greedy be matched up on Ahmmon most of the game? Is he a boundary corner like McFadden was for FSU?
 
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#10
Do you expect Greedy be matched up on Ahmmon most of the game? Is he a boundary corner like McFadden was for FSU?
I am not sure how they play Greedy, but yes, I would expect that. Watch some LSU highlights and if he is on the single receiver side, then that would more than likely be a yes. To put in perspective ours recently were Corn and then Malik the start the year, but after FSU, it was apprent the coaches got more confident in Jackson and he pretty much organically became our best corner. Watch his games against Syracuse and VT mainly.
 

DTP

Section 102
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#11
The X (split end) has to be on the line of scrimmage along with the Y (tight end). The Z (flanker) can be off the line.
 
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#12
The X (split end) has to be on the line of scrimmage along with the Y (tight end).
Assuming you're talking about the X & Y being on the same side, then no, the Y (TE) would be ineligible, He'd be covered up by the X (SE).

Now if you're talking about the Y (TE) being on the other side of the LOS, with Z the off the LOS, then yes, the Y would be eligible.

The only way Y can be eligible in the first example is if He catches a backward pass.
 
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#13
Eligible Receivers...Federation Rules:

The end man on either side of the men on the line, as long as he has a number from 1-49 or 80-99.

Any member of the backfield regardless of where they line up (as long as clearly in the back field) with the same numbering limitations.

A receiver is "covered" if he is on the LOS and there is a man outside of him on the line. In this case he is no longer the last man on the line.

A lateral pass can be thrown to any number and any alignment, as long as the flight of the ball is parallel to or moving away from the LOS.
 

DTP

Section 102
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#15
Assuming you're talking about the X & Y being on the same side, then no, the Y (TE) would be ineligible, He'd be covered up by the X (SE).

Now if you're talking about the Y (TE) being on the other side of the LOS, with Z the off the LOS, then yes, the Y would be eligible.

The only way Y can be eligible in the first example is if He catches a backward pass.
Technically the split end and tight end don't line up on the same side of theformation. Thus the term "end".
 

RiDLer80

All-American
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#16
Technically the split end and tight end don't line up on the same side of theformation. Thus the term "end".
I always confuse split end and flanker. Now I see why they're named that. That makes too much sense.
 

DTP

Section 102
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#17
It's a bit tougher now since everyone uses a ton of wideouts and tight ends aren't in line all the time anymore. If you think of it in old timey football style, it makes sense.
 
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