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Get used to the abbreviation CTE

mianjomar

Junior
Joined
Dec 3, 2012
Messages
1,801
CTE (Defined in the article) just may take the game we love away from us. The movement has already started and Nicks story below will certainly add fuel to the fire. We all know that congress loves to stick their nose into everything but taking on a sport as popular as football may be a political loser. The problem is that athletes influenced by concerned parents are already Opting for other sports. Additionally there seems to be no limit to legal exposure. Will we be seeing colleges and High Schools being sued at every hint of mental disfunction even if it occurs years later. This issue definitely has wheels. I am personally conflicted. I was part of the The Miami Dolphins booster club in the late sixties- early seventies era and knew personally some of the players on the undefeated team. Sadly some of them have cognitive disorders as mentioned below. The question is how many and what is the percentage of the whole team as compared to the general population percentages. I am also a NASCAR fan and have witnessed recently Dale Ernhardt and Carl Edwards two of the sports most popular drivers leave the sport partly due to similar concerns. Thoughts!

Ailing Dolphins LB Nick Buoniconti tells Sports Illustrated: ?I feel lost? | Miami Herald
 
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SoFlaSmitty

Junior
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
2,337
As long as the fans will pay and show up there will be games. People will always want to be professional players no matter the risk.
 

killacane

Sophomore
Joined
Nov 4, 2011
Messages
692
Last edited:

jw410

Senior
Joined
Dec 24, 2011
Messages
8,937
I admit I watch football less and less each year. A lot just has to do with enjoying other things in life... I do feel bad, but like any risk these players know what they are signing up for.
 

Esafille

Freshman
Joined
Nov 30, 2016
Messages
355
If you lack the education, resources, skills, etca to be wildly successful in another type of job, but can make some serious money bludgeoning people in a high-contact sport, then you might think it's worth the risk. Boxers probably don't think it's good for their long-term health get pounded in the head for a living either.

I think the more likely outcome is a continued trend in players retiring at earlier ages. Maybe run the risk for a little bit in that first or even second contract and then leave the game.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk
 

jakeman1

Junior
Joined
Nov 5, 2011
Messages
1,926
They've encouraged the big hits, leading with and/or targeting the other player's head, until just recently. They're teaching rugby-style tackling more now, which will help, and improving equipment, even looking at changing the field surface itself. All of it will reduce the issue going forward, but there are a lot of ex-players who will show the effects for years.
 

Tad Footeball

1996 Interim Big East Conference Commissioner
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
14,306
Delete thread. Propaganda from the War on Football. Possibly originating from Russia and/or China. First they take your football and then they take your country.

That aside, the media fueled hysteria around CTE just assumes that it's proven science. Far from it.....no matter what Will Smith told you in a bad accent.
 

ISLANDCANES

Buddy & Jimmy @ Greentree
Joined
May 9, 2017
Messages
153
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.
 

Rellyrell

All American
Joined
Dec 19, 2013
Messages
19,430
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.

I'll bite...

I'm wondering why the NFL is getting all this flack. These athletes are getting their head banged around since pop warner football. Then get banged around some more on the high school and collegiate levels. By the time they turn pro, most are already damaged. I never got to the collegiate level from my injury I sustained in high school and I'm still feeling the wear and tear from playing football from the age of 6 all the way to 17.

The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry, so it's real easy to attack them, but what about the high school coaches who run Oklahoma drills? Shouldn't they be held accountable? What about the college coaches threatening a player's position if they sit out? Shouldn't they be held responsible? Why is it that the NFL is the only entity we hear about in the news when High School Coaches and College Coaches have done the same thing that created this mentality before these guys get to the NFL?

Kids are taught to use their helmets to tackle. The term, "Head Up" starts at the pee wee level where kids would use their helmets as weapons. Fans going crazy when they hear the crack of the helmet on the Jr. levels. The problem is not the NFL; the problem is before you get to the NFL. The fundamental of tackling needs to start younger. Like at [MENTION=17156]STORM_FRONT 1964[/MENTION] stated, you can deliver a great hit using your shoulder to body. However we have to remember, it's a contact sport. There's risk rewards with this dangerous sport, just like boxing, and MMA.
 

dycane

Senior
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
2,987
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.

I'll bite...

I'm wondering why the NFL is getting all this flack. These athletes are getting their head banged around since pop warner football. Then get banged around some more on the high school and collegiate levels. By the time they turn pro, most are already damaged. I never got to the collegiate level from my injury I sustained in high school and I'm still feeling the wear and tear from playing football from the age of 6 all the way to 17.

The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry, so it's real easy to attack them, but what about the high school coaches who run Oklahoma drills? Shouldn't they be held accountable? What about the college coaches threatening a player's position if they sit out? Shouldn't they be held responsible? Why is it that the NFL is the only entity we hear about in the news when High School Coaches and College Coaches have done the same thing that created this mentality before these guys get to the NFL?

Kids are taught to use their helmets to tackle. The term, "Head Up" starts at the pee wee level where kids would use their helmets as weapons. Fans going crazy when they hear the crack of the helmet on the Jr. levels. The problem is not the NFL; the problem is before you get to the NFL. The fundamental of tackling needs to start younger. Like at [MENTION=17156]STORM_FRONT 1964[/MENTION] stated, you can deliver a great hit using your shoulder to body. However we have to remember, it's a contact sport. There's risk rewards with this dangerous sport, just like boxing, and MMA.

And therein lies the problem. The liability concerns will eventually lead to abolishment of pop warner and high school football (at least in the form we know it). When that happens, it's over.
 

JgDaCane

All-ACC
Joined
Jul 22, 2014
Messages
10,686
They're doing all they can to help prevent it. I'm sure helmets will become even better in the future.
 

90scane

Sophomore
Joined
Dec 26, 2015
Messages
1,317
CTE happens in hockey, boxing, MMA, soccer, NASCAR, some cases in baseball (hitting wall, catcher, hit by ball). Basketball may be the only major sport that has limited connections with it. As such, I can't see football going away. The NFL appears to be taking the most agressive approach to reducing chances of CTE for future generations.
 

Canezum5

Senior
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
3,260
I admit I watch football less and less each year. A lot just has to do with enjoying other things in life... I do feel bad, but like any risk these players know what they are signing up for.

:11263324214_66c20be

Duly Noted for when you give your typically dumb opinions.
 

Canezum5

Senior
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
3,260
CTE happens in hockey, boxing, MMA, soccer, NASCAR, some cases in baseball (hitting wall, catcher, hit by ball). Basketball may be the only major sport that has limited connections with it. As such, I can't see football going away. The NFL appears to be taking the most agressive approach to reducing chances of CTE for future generations.

Yeah, lol by owning ALL OF THE research on the brain and making sure no one REALLY knows how fuqed these dudes are.

Dont fall for the propaganda, please. The NFL does not give A fuq!!
 

Rellyrell

All American
Joined
Dec 19, 2013
Messages
19,430
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.

I'll bite...

I'm wondering why the NFL is getting all this flack. These athletes are getting their head banged around since pop warner football. Then get banged around some more on the high school and collegiate levels. By the time they turn pro, most are already damaged. I never got to the collegiate level from my injury I sustained in high school and I'm still feeling the wear and tear from playing football from the age of 6 all the way to 17.

The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry, so it's real easy to attack them, but what about the high school coaches who run Oklahoma drills? Shouldn't they be held accountable? What about the college coaches threatening a player's position if they sit out? Shouldn't they be held responsible? Why is it that the NFL is the only entity we hear about in the news when High School Coaches and College Coaches have done the same thing that created this mentality before these guys get to the NFL?

Kids are taught to use their helmets to tackle. The term, "Head Up" starts at the pee wee level where kids would use their helmets as weapons. Fans going crazy when they hear the crack of the helmet on the Jr. levels. The problem is not the NFL; the problem is before you get to the NFL. The fundamental of tackling needs to start younger. Like at [MENTION=17156]STORM_FRONT 1964[/MENTION] stated, you can deliver a great hit using your shoulder to body. However we have to remember, it's a contact sport. There's risk rewards with this dangerous sport, just like boxing, and MMA.

And therein lies the problem. The liability concerns will eventually lead to abolishment of pop warner and high school football (at least in the form we know it). When that happens, it's over.

Concerns should help coaches provide training in tackling properly at the pop-warner level.

"The Big Hit" is what got players notoriety and popularity...something that ESPN and ABC Sports and other outlets had a big hand in perpetuating as they had their "You Got Jacked Up" , "Top 10 Hits of the Week" segments. Hard hits were glorified. The media glorified these activities, just like they glorified Mike Tyson's greatest knockouts. Now this same media is trying to waggle the finger at the NFL. It's all b.s to me. At the end of the day, this a fierce contact sport. All sports come w/ risk and reward.
 

Canezum5

Senior
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
3,260
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.

I'll bite...

I'm wondering why the NFL is getting all this flack. These athletes are getting their head banged around since pop warner football. Then get banged around some more on the high school and collegiate levels. By the time they turn pro, most are already damaged. I never got to the collegiate level from my injury I sustained in high school and I'm still feeling the wear and tear from playing football from the age of 6 all the way to 17.

The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry, so it's real easy to attack them, but what about the high school coaches who run Oklahoma drills? Shouldn't they be held accountable? What about the college coaches threatening a player's position if they sit out? Shouldn't they be held responsible? Why is it that the NFL is the only entity we hear about in the news when High School Coaches and College Coaches have done the same thing that created this mentality before these guys get to the NFL?

Kids are taught to use their helmets to tackle. The term, "Head Up" starts at the pee wee level where kids would use their helmets as weapons. Fans going crazy when they hear the crack of the helmet on the Jr. levels. The problem is not the NFL; the problem is before you get to the NFL. The fundamental of tackling needs to start younger. Like at [MENTION=17156]STORM_FRONT 1964[/MENTION] stated, you can deliver a great hit using your shoulder to body. However we have to remember, it's a contact sport. There's risk rewards with this dangerous sport, just like boxing, and MMA.

Strong post. I cant imagine how many concussions i got in high school alone, not to mention other injuries.

Sometimes when i look at NFL players and I think " God, how can you even sleep at night ?" I know most of them HAVE TO BE addicted to pain pills. Gotta be.

At the end of the day you will never be able to make football safe and exciting.

Its a spontaneous collision sport where the physics and angles are so random youre bound to be injured no matter how safe you try to be.

Hell, ive seen countless players( J.Carter-FSu), ejected for legal hits because theyre so vicious they look illegal and STILL give concussions due to whiplash and Head to ground impact.

Its just dumb af to try to make football safe. Its an oxymoron, really.

You want to play? Well, you know the risk.

The game shouldn't stop because people CHOOSE to play.

no one is forcing them.
 

skeeper

CGHS
Joined
Aug 12, 2012
Messages
781
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.

I'll bite...

I'm wondering why the NFL is getting all this flack. These athletes are getting their head banged around since pop warner football. Then get banged around some more on the high school and collegiate levels. By the time they turn pro, most are already damaged. I never got to the collegiate level from my injury I sustained in high school and I'm still feeling the wear and tear from playing football from the age of 6 all the way to 17.

The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry, so it's real easy to attack them, but what about the high school coaches who run Oklahoma drills? Shouldn't they be held accountable? What about the college coaches threatening a player's position if they sit out? Shouldn't they be held responsible? Why is it that the NFL is the only entity we hear about in the news when High School Coaches and College Coaches have done the same thing that created this mentality before these guys get to the NFL?

Kids are taught to use their helmets to tackle. The term, "Head Up" starts at the pee wee level where kids would use their helmets as weapons. Fans going crazy when they hear the crack of the helmet on the Jr. levels. The problem is not the NFL; the problem is before you get to the NFL. The fundamental of tackling needs to start younger. Like at [MENTION=17156]STORM_FRONT 1964[/MENTION] stated, you can deliver a great hit using your shoulder to body. However we have to remember, it's a contact sport. There's risk rewards with this dangerous sport, just like boxing, and MMA.

Youth football today has more emphasis than ever on taking the head out of tackling, shoulder tackle, roll tackle, etc. In Atlanta, all coaches have to take certification courses on teaching these fundamentals.

Of course kids will still use their head at times, but I believe the awareness is much higher and subsequent coaching techniques will have a positive impact. In Atlanta, the number of kids participating in youth football has dropped significantly over the past 3-4 years. In some areas, programs have had to shut down due to low numbers.
 

FG305

Dat Rang
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
2,145
There are more and more studies around this showing the impact of CTE and the link to ALS, suicide and other mental illnesses. It is scary to think about all the things we do not know about related to CTE and what football, soccer and other athletes might be dealing with. I have a hard time watching hits these days that used to make football so exciting.

https://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/27/...n-trauma-disease-in-a-soccer-player.html?_r=0

https://theconcussionblog.com/what-is-cte/



Yes I agree... and I think continued teaching the fundamentals at every level and the appropriate ways to tackle is important. You can still delever a hard hit that separates the ball carrier from the football using your shoulders, and delivering the hit from the neck down. Also continued research so that our equiptment becomes 21st century stuff. Helmets need to reach another level of technology. So that the head is protected. Applied research. NFL money can do this..."IF" they want to.

I'll bite...

I'm wondering why the NFL is getting all this flack. These athletes are getting their head banged around since pop warner football. Then get banged around some more on the high school and collegiate levels. By the time they turn pro, most are already damaged. I never got to the collegiate level from my injury I sustained in high school and I'm still feeling the wear and tear from playing football from the age of 6 all the way to 17.

The NFL is a multi-billion dollar industry, so it's real easy to attack them, but what about the high school coaches who run Oklahoma drills? Shouldn't they be held accountable? What about the college coaches threatening a player's position if they sit out? Shouldn't they be held responsible? Why is it that the NFL is the only entity we hear about in the news when High School Coaches and College Coaches have done the same thing that created this mentality before these guys get to the NFL?

Kids are taught to use their helmets to tackle. The term, "Head Up" starts at the pee wee level where kids would use their helmets as weapons. Fans going crazy when they hear the crack of the helmet on the Jr. levels. The problem is not the NFL; the problem is before you get to the NFL. The fundamental of tackling needs to start younger. Like at [MENTION=17156]STORM_FRONT 1964[/MENTION] stated, you can deliver a great hit using your shoulder to body. However we have to remember, it's a contact sport. There's risk rewards with this dangerous sport, just like boxing, and MMA.

Yep, all of the above posters were vigorously fapping when Norton drove Francois's head into the ground...
 

Salt

"It's All About The Roo"
Joined
Jan 2, 2015
Messages
4,560
Injuries will always be a part of any contact sport but I think in the area of frequent concussions leading to more permanent injuries in football they need to start fundamentally changing tackling techniques to how they do it in rugby. I know some NFL teams are using more rugby style techniques in their tackling drills and Diaz implemented some of these techniques last Spring at UM. I recall he was having guys tackling without pads to force them to wrap up instead of going for drill shots all the time.
 
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