The RPO and its affect on the offensive line....

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Dec 6, 2015
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#1
Does the RPO congest running lanes, making it more difficult to establish a consistent run game?

The run read is at the edges first, then inside. Defenses that crash inside accelerate the read before it can develop. D-lineman key the tailback; LBs & Safeties fold-in on the QB once he commits to the run.

Talented NFL-caliber players kill these offenses. It works best only when your trigger man is, well, Superman because he needs to outquick, out-think and outrun a number of defenders who read their keys correctly and are in position to make the play.

Anyone who believes for an instant that all 11 players on offense are 100% schematically committed to run the football with single-assignments on a basic RPO play is a fool.

The point of attack is isolated. A good defensive read and the play is overrun by defenders. I see it happen 30, 40 times every week during the season with teams running this system. It’s part of the risk/reward.

So the answer is yes. In an RPO an offensive line is less likely to fire out and engage as a unit in run-blocking assignments. That is the truth.


Does that have anything to do with not being able to run with success early in games last season?

Does it explain what we're seeing this spring?

Interested in all of your thoughts.
 
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#3
It definitely seems like it could be a factor.
Or maybe Searles is just mediocre.

I'm going to start re-watching games to compare set run plays vs runs from the RPO.

IIRC, when Richt had the game in hand, he ran set run plays and not the RPO. A lot of rushing stats were padded in the 4th quarter...
 
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#4
Does the RPO congest running lanes, making it more difficult to establish a consistent run game?

The run read is at the edges first, then inside. Defenses that crash inside accelerate the read before it can develop. D-lineman key the tailback; LBs & Safeties fold-in on the QB once he commits to the run.

Talented NFL-caliber players kill these offenses. It works best only when your trigger man is, well, Superman because he needs to outquick, out-think and outrun a number of defenders who read their keys correctly and are in position to make the play.
Read this and kind of didn't care to read the rest. You must not have watched the Eagles with Nick Foles at QB against the Patriots in the Superbowl...
 
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#5
It definitely seems like it could be a factor.
Or maybe Searles is just mediocre.

I'm going to start re-watching games to compare set run plays vs runs from the RPO.

IIRC, when Richt had the game in hand, he ran set run plays and not the RPO. A lot of rushing stats were padded in the 4th quarter...
There’s many NFL teams that use the RPO concept; Eagles being one of them. Go back and watch the Eagles’ game, and see how their OL fared. KC and I believe NE also run a version of the RPO.

It’s not the OL as opposed to the QB who anchors this offense. If you have a QB that can keep the P in the RPO option honest, it’s a nightmare for opposing defenses. Our problem is our QB doesn’t create fear for the pass. When Kaaya was here, he didn’t create fear of the R, but he became successful in this offense towards the latter part of the season b/c of his abilty to sell the play action b/c of his ability to pass.
 
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#7
Read this and kind of didn't care to read the rest. You must not have watched the Eagles with Nick Foles at QB against the Patriots in the Superbowl...
What does the Patriots not making the right reads have to do with Nick Foles? Philly didn't find significant success on the ground. He passed for nearly 400 yards though.

I'm speaking directly on the impact a RPO has on the RUN game.
 
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#8
What does the Patriots not making the right reads have to do with Nick Foles? Philly didn't find significant success on the ground. He passed for nearly 400 yards though.

I'm speaking directly on the impact a RPO has on the RUN game.
Eagles averaged 6.1 yards per carry that game...164 yards on the ground my man
 
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#9
There’s many NFL teams that use the RPO concept; Eagles being one of them. Go back and watch the Eagles’ game, and see how their OL fared. KC and I believe NE also run a version of the RPO.

It’s not the OL as opposed to the QB who anchors this offense. If you have a QB that can keep the P in the RPO option honest, it’s a nightmare for opposing defenses. Our problem is our QB doesn’t create fear for the pass. When Kaaya was here, he didn’t create fear of the R, but he became successful in this offense towards the latter part of the season b/c of his abilty to sell the play action b/c of his ability to pass.
The QB making the defense respect the passing game benefits the run game in the sense that the defense won't stack the box. But Miami is having problems creating lanes against 4 man fronts with no blitzing.
 
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#10
Eagles averaged 6.1 yards per carry that game...164 yards on the ground my man
You're absolutely right, because they were successful in (1) game, that dismisses my op. I happen to agree in that it was a balanced performance, but the Eagles were not efficient at all throughout the regular season on 3rd down.

If I wanted to point to a game that at face value dismisses the points made in my original post, I'd bring up VT and ND. Those two games were the exception to the rule for last season, so it's a waste of time.

The Eagles kept the Pat's on their heels all night with their play calling. They called plays with purpose. Miami looks like there is no rhyme or reason behind any play call.
 
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#12
Does the RPO congest running lanes, making it more difficult to establish a consistent run game?

The run read is at the edges first, then inside. Defenses that crash inside accelerate the read before it can develop. D-lineman key the tailback; LBs & Safeties fold-in on the QB once he commits to the run.

Talented NFL-caliber players kill these offenses. It works best only when your trigger man is, well, Superman because he needs to outquick, out-think and outrun a number of defenders who read their keys correctly and are in position to make the play.

Anyone who believes for an instant that all 11 players on offense are 100% schematically committed to run the football with single-assignments on a basic RPO play is a fool.

The point of attack is isolated. A good defensive read and the play is overrun by defenders. I see it happen 30, 40 times every week during the season with teams running this system. It’s part of the risk/reward.

So the answer is yes. In an RPO an offensive line is less likely to fire out and engage as a unit in run-blocking assignments. That is the truth.


Does that have anything to do with not being able to run with success early in games last season?

Does it explain what we're seeing this spring?

Interested in all of your thoughts.
Yes...Miami Oline is always in pass pro, you never see them with their hands dug in buts high ready to drive folks off the ball.That's why I will continue to say Miami is flawed offensively from a schematics perspective...Richt has know idea about todays offenses he is leaning on the job...between coming to Miami it had been over ten years before he actually called plays and during that time defenses were simple and he was fort Fortunately enough to have NFL QB's...our problems on offense is more play caller and offensive philosophy than talent
 

Coach Macho

aka Beardy Ryan
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#13
By the sound of your post it seems that you don't quite understand the difference between an RPO and a Read/Option.
What you're referring to is the Read/Option not an RPO. An RPO's read is not on the edges. During an RPO the QB reads a Linebacker or Safety and the DE is usually being blocked. Read/Option is when the QB reads an unblocked DE.

Regardless...
Neither one of these concepts should affect the running game in a negative way. If anything, it helps the running game by giving the defense an extra threat to worry about.

The OL is doing the exact same thing regardless. They block as if it's a running play. They block a zone and they usually have no clue who ends up with the football.
 
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#14
By the sound of your post it seems that you don't quite understand the difference between an RPO and a Read/Option.
What you're referring to is the Read/Option not an RPO. An RPO's read is not on the edges. During an RPO the QB reads a Linebacker or Safety and the DE is usually being blocked. Read/Option is when the QB reads an unblocked DE.

Regardless...
Neither one of these concepts should affect the running game in a negative way. If anything, it helps the running game by giving the defense an extra threat to worry about.

The OL is doing the exact same thing regardless. They block as if it's a running play. They block a zone and they usually have no clue who ends up with the football.
I still can’t believe how often this has to be explained. Ever since Greg McElroy got them mixed up saying Brad Kaaya was running the read option against Appalachian State 2 years ago this board has been thoroughly confused.
 

Cribby

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#15
What does the Patriots not making the right reads have to do with Nick Foles? Philly didn't find significant success on the ground. He passed for nearly 400 yards though.

I'm speaking directly on the impact a RPO has on the RUN game.
The Eagles were one of the best running teams in the nfl.

The rpo actually opens up more lanes and helps the running game.
 
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#17
yawn
 

Cribby

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#18
The Eagles also had arguably the best OL in the NFC. last season by year's end.

It was a solid ol but we were playing without a couple ol including arguably the best Lt Jason Peters.

He was replaced by Vaitai who’s nowhere near the player. When healthy it’s arguably the best.

What changed was when foles entered they went to a lot more rpo, way more than what they used under Wentz. It helped Foles and the new ol being thrown into the fire.

The coaches said Foles best year was when he used it under Chirp, when he threw 27 td and 2 int. So they scrapped a lot of the old stuff.

The rpo is why philly made their run.
 
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#19
It takes a combination of very good talent and good schematics which the eagles had last season (which pains me to say as a Giants fan but I digress.)

Hopefully the Canes improve talent wise and can use the RPO the way Richt envisions.
 
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#20
You're absolutely right, because they were successful in (1) game, that dismisses my op. I happen to agree in that it was a balanced performance, but the Eagles were not efficient at all throughout the regular season on 3rd down.

If I wanted to point to a game that at face value dismisses the points made in my original post, I'd bring up VT and ND. Those two games were the exception to the rule for last season, so it's a waste of time.

The Eagles kept the Pat's on their heels all night with their play calling. They called plays with purpose. Miami looks like there is no rhyme or reason behind any play call.
Actually the Eagles ran the ball very well all year