Potential NCAA Rule Changes

Liberty City El

Dejazmach
Joined
May 14, 2016
Messages
18,542
This is from the article RVA just posted:

In plain English: if a college program is to hire a high school coach it must immediately hire him to an on-field position, or it can not have recruited a player from that high school for two years prior to hiring the coach and must also refrain from recruiting players from said high school for another two years after his employment. That’s an entire cycle of high school players a college program would have to bar itself from in order to hire a single coach.

The intent is clear and admirable — to curb basketball-style package deals wherein commitments from highly-recruited players are contingent upon schools finding jobs for coaches or family members. It was referenced in the Michael Johnson saga, where Jim Harbaugh hired an offensive analyst who happened to be a California high school coach and the father of a top-rated quarterback in the class of 2019. (Johnson also happened to be a former NFL offensive coordinator and never actually joined the Michigan staff, accepting the wide receivers job at Oregon just days after the Michigan news broke.)

But the unintended consequence of Bylaw 11.4.3 could essentially choke off one of the major pipelines for college coaching talent in the NCAA. Arizona State’s Todd Graham, Auburn’s Gus Malzahn, Ole Miss’s Hugh Freeze, SMU’s Chad Morris, Tulsa’s Philip Montgomery, UAB’s Bill Clark and UNLV’s Tony Sanchez famously launched head college coaching careers from high school football. All moved into directly into on-field roles, moves that would have been permissible under the new bylaw. But as staffs have grown, programs have moved to hiring high school coaches into off-field roles, where they then move on the field at that program or elsewhere. For instance, Malzahn hired Chip Lindsey from Spain Park (Ala.) High School to become an offensive analyst at Auburn during the Tigers’ eventual SEC championship of 2013; Lindsey is now Auburn’s offensive coordinator. Nick Saban plucked Jeremy Pruitt from his defensive coordinator job at Hoover (Ala.) High School to become the director of player development on his original Alabama staff in 2007; Pruitt is now Saban’s defensive coordinator.

Neither Lindsey or Pruitt would have been hired had Bylaw 11.4.3 gone into effect a decade earlier.

Furthermore, the rule also bans college programs from even hiring high school coaches from working camps unless they plan on abandoning recruiting that high school for the foreseeable future.

Reads Bylaw 13.12.2.2.5: “In football, an institution or staff member shall not employ (either on a volunteer or paid basis) an individual associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete at the institution’s camp or clinic (including a coaches clinic or a camp or clinic involving non-prospects), unless at least two years (24 months) have elapsed since the prospective student-athlete’s initial full-time enrollment at the institution.”

In the NCAA’s attempt to prevent adults from attaching themselves like leeches to their best players’ recruiting processes, it has essentially banned coaches from talent-producing high schools from ever working in college football. If these rules are approved as written, coaches at powerhouse high schools could kiss any college coaching dreams goodbye.

(Also, for the sake of not making this a huge quote thread, you don't have to quote this whole comment to respond).
 
Last edited:

Liberty City El

Dejazmach
Joined
May 14, 2016
Messages
18,542
I like the early NSD rule of having kids (who want to) sign there LOI in December, it gives them an opportunity to be done with the recruiting process & no longer have to deal with the shitty part of the crootin' season in January/February.

It also helps the staff focus their attention on kids who are still wavering & won't sign until February, so if you're really serious about committing, then go ahead & sign your LOI in December, no need to play games all January at the last minute.

But, with the 10th assistant coach rule, I like the idea of adding another Coach to the staff, but as it was pointed out in that article RVA posted, there's some definite unintended consequences & it's mainly Harbaugh's fault because he fucked up in trying to hire that 2019 QB's dad.

I think they should alter the rules a lil bit to not be so stringent on High School coach hires, but overall, I think a 10th full-time assistant Coach is a great idea.
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2014
Messages
8,388
This is from the article RVA just posted:

In plain English: if a college program is to hire a high school coach it must immediately hire him to an on-field position, or it can not have recruited a player from that high school for two years prior to hiring the coach and must also refrain from recruiting players from said high school for another two years after his employment. That’s an entire cycle of high school players a college program would have to bar itself from in order to hire a single coach.

The intent is clear and admirable — to curb basketball-style package deals wherein commitments from highly-recruited players are contingent upon schools finding jobs for coaches or family members. It was referenced in the Michael Johnson saga, where Jim Harbaugh hired an offensive analyst who happened to be a California high school coach and the father of a top-rated quarterback in the class of 2019. (Johnson also happened to be a former NFL offensive coordinator and never actually joined the Michigan staff, accepting the wide receivers job at Oregon just days after the Michigan news broke.)

But the unintended consequence of Bylaw 11.4.3 could essentially choke off one of the major pipelines for college coaching talent in the NCAA. Arizona State’s Todd Graham, Auburn’s Gus Malzahn, Ole Miss’s Hugh Freeze, SMU’s Chad Morris, Tulsa’s Philip Montgomery, UAB’s Bill Clark and UNLV’s Tony Sanchez famously launched head college coaching careers from high school football. All moved into directly into on-field roles, moves that would have been permissible under the new bylaw. But as staffs have grown, programs have moved to hiring high school coaches into off-field roles, where they then move on the field at that program or elsewhere. For instance, Malzahn hired Chip Lindsey from Spain Park (Ala.) High School to become an offensive analyst at Auburn during the Tigers’ eventual SEC championship of 2013; Lindsey is now Auburn’s offensive coordinator. Nick Saban plucked Jeremy Pruitt from his defensive coordinator job at Hoover (Ala.) High School to become the director of player development on his original Alabama staff in 2007; Pruitt is now Saban’s defensive coordinator.

Neither Lindsey or Pruitt would have been hired had Bylaw 11.4.3 gone into effect a decade earlier.

Furthermore, the rule also bans college programs from even hiring high school coaches from working camps unless they plan on abandoning recruiting that high school for the foreseeable future.

Reads Bylaw 13.12.2.2.5: “In football, an institution or staff member shall not employ (either on a volunteer or paid basis) an individual associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete at the institution’s camp or clinic (including a coaches clinic or a camp or clinic involving non-prospects), unless at least two years (24 months) have elapsed since the prospective student-athlete’s initial full-time enrollment at the institution.”

In the NCAA’s attempt to prevent adults from attaching themselves like leeches to their best players’ recruiting processes, it has essentially banned coaches from talent-producing high schools from ever working in college football. If these rules are approved as written, coaches at powerhouse high schools could kiss any college coaching dreams goodbye.

Doubt this gets passed. I completely understand this, but at the same time it really would make it so much harder for HS coaches to move up to college. This stuff doesn't even happen that often, like once a yr per team max. Not really sure how to combat it, but this doesn't seem like the right way to solve it. Maybe if instead of 2 yrs before and after, 1 yr before and after would be better...or maybe just 1 yr after you sign the coach.
 
Joined
Apr 28, 2014
Messages
8,388
I like the early NSD rule of having kids (who want to) sign there LOI in December, it gives them an opportunity to be done with the recruiting process & no longer have to deal with the shitty part of the crootin' season in January/February.

It also helps the staff focus their attention on kids who are still wavering & won't sign until February, so if you're really serious about committing, then go ahead & sign your LOI in December, no need to play games all January at the last minute.

But, with the 10th assistant coach rule, I like the idea of adding another Coach to the staff, but as it was pointed out in that article RVA posted, there's some definite unintended consequences & it's mainly Harbaugh's fault because he fucked up in trying to hire that 2019 QB's dad.

I think they should alter the rules a lil bit to not be so stringent on High School coach hires, but overall, I think a 10th full-time assistant Coach is a great idea.

yeah I support an early signing period in december. But I don't think i'd support one thats before their senior season starts. And definitely support a 10th coach. But what they should do is pay the players. Think how easily they are about to pass a rule to pay another coach who will make 100k/yr (could pay every player on the roster $1k for that). yet they can't pay the players or at the very very least give the student the opportunity to profit off their name/likeness
 
W

westcoastcanes

Guest
This is from the article RVA just posted:

In plain English: if a college program is to hire a high school coach it must immediately hire him to an on-field position, or it can not have recruited a player from that high school for two years prior to hiring the coach and must also refrain from recruiting players from said high school for another two years after his employment. That’s an entire cycle of high school players a college program would have to bar itself from in order to hire a single coach.

The intent is clear and admirable — to curb basketball-style package deals wherein commitments from highly-recruited players are contingent upon schools finding jobs for coaches or family members. It was referenced in the Michael Johnson saga, where Jim Harbaugh hired an offensive analyst who happened to be a California high school coach and the father of a top-rated quarterback in the class of 2019. (Johnson also happened to be a former NFL offensive coordinator and never actually joined the Michigan staff, accepting the wide receivers job at Oregon just days after the Michigan news broke.)

But the unintended consequence of Bylaw 11.4.3 could essentially choke off one of the major pipelines for college coaching talent in the NCAA. Arizona State’s Todd Graham, Auburn’s Gus Malzahn, Ole Miss’s Hugh Freeze, SMU’s Chad Morris, Tulsa’s Philip Montgomery, UAB’s Bill Clark and UNLV’s Tony Sanchez famously launched head college coaching careers from high school football. All moved into directly into on-field roles, moves that would have been permissible under the new bylaw. But as staffs have grown, programs have moved to hiring high school coaches into off-field roles, where they then move on the field at that program or elsewhere. For instance, Malzahn hired Chip Lindsey from Spain Park (Ala.) High School to become an offensive analyst at Auburn during the Tigers’ eventual SEC championship of 2013; Lindsey is now Auburn’s offensive coordinator. Nick Saban plucked Jeremy Pruitt from his defensive coordinator job at Hoover (Ala.) High School to become the director of player development on his original Alabama staff in 2007; Pruitt is now Saban’s defensive coordinator.

Neither Lindsey or Pruitt would have been hired had Bylaw 11.4.3 gone into effect a decade earlier.

Furthermore, the rule also bans college programs from even hiring high school coaches from working camps unless they plan on abandoning recruiting that high school for the foreseeable future.

Reads Bylaw 13.12.2.2.5: “In football, an institution or staff member shall not employ (either on a volunteer or paid basis) an individual associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete at the institution’s camp or clinic (including a coaches clinic or a camp or clinic involving non-prospects), unless at least two years (24 months) have elapsed since the prospective student-athlete’s initial full-time enrollment at the institution.”

In the NCAA’s attempt to prevent adults from attaching themselves like leeches to their best players’ recruiting processes, it has essentially banned coaches from talent-producing high schools from ever working in college football. If these rules are approved as written, coaches at powerhouse high schools could kiss any college coaching dreams goodbye.

Doubt this gets passed. I completely understand this, but at the same time it really would make it so much harder for HS coaches to move up to college. This stuff doesn't even happen that often, like once a yr per team max. Not really sure how to combat it, but this doesn't seem like the right way to solve it. Maybe if instead of 2 yrs before and after, 1 yr before and after would be better...or maybe just 1 yr after you sign the coach.

While the intent seems clear and I like the idea of curbing the leech effect if executed appropriately, it does not seem reasonable as written.

I agree, no way that gets passed. I wonder if they did something like requiring a duration commitment to non field coaching positions would impact this practice.
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
8,055
Would like Hurlie Brown back on the staff tbh. He landed some good ones for us, he knows what it means to be a Miami Player (see the infamous Safety from Delaware video), and he's fam.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
3,445
The problem with letting guys sign before their senior year is for coaches it's still an evaluation period. For players that are choosing schools based on coaching staffs (which shouldn't happen but...) what if the coach you signed to get fired or leaves for another job how do you know you will still be afforded an opportunity at the same school. Obviously this isn't for the 5 start kids but it will be more 3* kids who sign than 5*. I think for both parties it's best to wait until after their last season
 

Paskudnyak

Band
Joined
Feb 16, 2017
Messages
191
Makes sense. Give the young men and their families even more to celebrate and be grateful for over the holidays.

It also allows $EC Alumni and Bagmen to share in the holiday spirit.

Everybody wins.
 

teddywestside

Band
Banned
Joined
Aug 30, 2015
Messages
1,025
If the rule passes, Richt needs to demote Brown to RBs coach, cut his damn salary to 250k or whatever a competitive RBs coach salary is, and find a real fukking OC to call plays.
 

Paskudnyak

Band
Joined
Feb 16, 2017
Messages
191
Richt called good plays last season. The OLine and at times Kayaa struggled with yet another new system. Richt not catering to Brad last season with the playcalling tells me everything I need to know about the direction of the offense. That was a bold and calculated move.
 

RVACane

Lone Wolf Maude
Staff member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
27,975
Richt called good plays last season. The OLine and at times Kayaa struggled with yet another new system. Richt not catering to Brad last season with the playcalling tells me everything I need to know about the direction of the offense. That was a bold and calculated move.

It was unfortunate that Richt didn't adjust to his talent level with his playcalling. I'm certain that it cost us during that 4 game slide. That said, he'll have more and more of his players soon enough. Clearly, he's doing a masterful job recruiting talent here that fits his system.
 
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Tad Footeball

1996 Interim Big East Conference Commissioner
Joined
Feb 6, 2014
Messages
14,142
I like the early NSD rule of having kids (who want to) sign there LOI in December, it gives them an opportunity to be done with the recruiting process & no longer have to deal with the ****ty part of the crootin' season in January/February.

It also helps the staff focus their attention on kids who are still wavering & won't sign until February, so if you're really serious about committing, then go ahead & sign your LOI in December, no need to play games all January at the last minute.

But, with the 10th assistant coach rule, I like the idea of adding another Coach to the staff, but as it was pointed out in that article RVA posted, there's some definite unintended consequences & it's mainly Harbaugh's fault because he ****ed up in trying to hire that 2019 QB's dad.

I think they should alter the rules a lil bit to not be so stringent on High School coach hires, but overall, I think a 10th full-time assistant Coach is a great idea.

Spot on. I'd maybe jusr start with banning job offers of any sort to family members unless your parent was already coaching on the college level. I understand the intent of the high school coach proposal but it obviously is too unfair to guys coaching at big time high school programs that are ready to make the leap to college.
 

kryptonite

AARP
Joined
Dec 13, 2012
Messages
11,261
I like the early NSD rule of having kids (who want to) sign there LOI in December, it gives them an opportunity to be done with the recruiting process & no longer have to deal with the shitty part of the crootin' season in January/February.

It also helps the staff focus their attention on kids who are still wavering & won't sign until February, so if you're really serious about committing, then go ahead & sign your LOI in December, no need to play games all January at the last minute.

But, with the 10th assistant coach rule, I like the idea of adding another Coach to the staff, but as it was pointed out in that article RVA posted, there's some definite unintended consequences & it's mainly Harbaugh's fault because he fucked up in trying to hire that 2019 QB's dad.

I think they should alter the rules a lil bit to not be so stringent on High School coach hires, but overall, I think a 10th full-time assistant Coach is a great idea.

My only concern with staff size is that the bamas of the world have plenty of money for a 10th coach. We have money, but as staff size increases, at some point they have an advantage.
 

MedleyCane

Senior
Joined
Nov 4, 2011
Messages
6,936
Early signing period is not good for UM, at all. Not sure why so many Cane fans clamor for this rule.
 

FG305

Dat Rang
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
2,145
This is from the article RVA just posted:

In plain English: if a college program is to hire a high school coach it must immediately hire him to an on-field position, or it can not have recruited a player from that high school for two years prior to hiring the coach and must also refrain from recruiting players from said high school for another two years after his employment. That’s an entire cycle of high school players a college program would have to bar itself from in order to hire a single coach.

The intent is clear and admirable — to curb basketball-style package deals wherein commitments from highly-recruited players are contingent upon schools finding jobs for coaches or family members. It was referenced in the Michael Johnson saga, where Jim Harbaugh hired an offensive analyst who happened to be a California high school coach and the father of a top-rated quarterback in the class of 2019. (Johnson also happened to be a former NFL offensive coordinator and never actually joined the Michigan staff, accepting the wide receivers job at Oregon just days after the Michigan news broke.)

But the unintended consequence of Bylaw 11.4.3 could essentially choke off one of the major pipelines for college coaching talent in the NCAA. Arizona State’s Todd Graham, Auburn’s Gus Malzahn, Ole Miss’s Hugh Freeze, SMU’s Chad Morris, Tulsa’s Philip Montgomery, UAB’s Bill Clark and UNLV’s Tony Sanchez famously launched head college coaching careers from high school football. All moved into directly into on-field roles, moves that would have been permissible under the new bylaw. But as staffs have grown, programs have moved to hiring high school coaches into off-field roles, where they then move on the field at that program or elsewhere. For instance, Malzahn hired Chip Lindsey from Spain Park (Ala.) High School to become an offensive analyst at Auburn during the Tigers’ eventual SEC championship of 2013; Lindsey is now Auburn’s offensive coordinator. Nick Saban plucked Jeremy Pruitt from his defensive coordinator job at Hoover (Ala.) High School to become the director of player development on his original Alabama staff in 2007; Pruitt is now Saban’s defensive coordinator.

Neither Lindsey or Pruitt would have been hired had Bylaw 11.4.3 gone into effect a decade earlier.

Furthermore, the rule also bans college programs from even hiring high school coaches from working camps unless they plan on abandoning recruiting that high school for the foreseeable future.

Reads Bylaw 13.12.2.2.5: “In football, an institution or staff member shall not employ (either on a volunteer or paid basis) an individual associated with a recruited prospective student-athlete at the institution’s camp or clinic (including a coaches clinic or a camp or clinic involving non-prospects), unless at least two years (24 months) have elapsed since the prospective student-athlete’s initial full-time enrollment at the institution.”

In the NCAA’s attempt to prevent adults from attaching themselves like leeches to their best players’ recruiting processes, it has essentially banned coaches from talent-producing high schools from ever working in college football. If these rules are approved as written, coaches at powerhouse high schools could kiss any college coaching dreams goodbye.

(Also, for the sake of not making this a huge quote thread, you don't have to quote this whole comment to respond).

Michigan also recently hired Devin Bush's dad and 5* dt Rashan Gary's coach...
 
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