From The Perch: Enos

Roman Marciante

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Feb 21, 2018
Messages
508
Your InSight X/O team has assembled. Like a kick ass film reading Voltron, we will learn our new Offensive Coordinator's style. This FTP will focus heavily on his most recent time as a play caller with Arkansas. A time span that was from 2015-2017. We will also dive into his time at Alabama and show some developmental clips of Jalen Hurts in a following thread. (A qb he mentored and who has admitted Miami interest) So strike up that classic eighties cartoon theme music as "I'll FORM THE HEAD!"

One of the biggest criticisms about Miami's offense in the past was its inability to have creative answers to beat press coverage and especially on third down. Enos will make things strategically difficult on defenses doing that in the future. When this play begins, the X receiver is being press covered by the Gator's boundary corner. (press not pictured) But the MOTION into a bunch formation essentially nullifies any notion of pressing the receiver.

The gator's defense is now trying to react on the fly and are trying to hand signal into a different coverage. They essentially don't communicate it properly and two receivers are wide open on third down. The quarterback Austin Allen actually missed a CROSSING route for a touchdown here but ultimately the design of the play is what manufactured the first.


Once again you'll notice how pre snap MOTION on third down will confuse Bama's defense. You'll notice Bama try to check to a coverage when they notice the motion move away from the bunch then recheck to the original call as he comes back. It's once again too late. A third down manufactured gem that easily sprung a drag for a first down. There was also a natural rub element to this play for good measure when the the lead receiver in the bunch runs his vertical.


Enos will also break another vocal complaint that Miami's offense under Mark Richt simply did not run natural counters off plays. It was a down and distance predicated offense with no building block continuity. Enos will build a big block house if you let him. Play one. Simple I left Twins right from the start. But this is 31 set personnel. Two half backs are in the I and the fullback will MOTION into the formation from twins and down block for some Big boy football. (No. It is not a fullback dive from the I)


The Very Next play. Looks identical. It starts identical. It is not Identical. I also like the quarterbacking aspect here. He carries out his play fake, sets his feet and delivers a perfect strike. This doesn't have time to set and gather. It is a bit of an off platform back foot throw that is necessary because of the need to split the window. Great play design and natural counter for six.


I want to accentuate some quarterback friendly components to this offense. Mainly Enos ability to have check downs in plain natural view of the quarterback with relation to his progressions. Here is an all vertical concept from 11 set personnel. Trips formation. The quarterback simply reads the will backer after his play fake. When the linebacker decides to attach to the #3 receiver in pass coverage, no big deal. A halfback is in view and this play is wide open when his check races into the flat.

Miami would run a ton of all vertical concepts with the halfback checking into the middle of the field. That is fine but Miami quarterbacks never consistently hit that check down. Like EVER. This is better in my opinion for a quarterback. As a play designer Enos understands the quarterback's eyes will focus on the Trips side. Let's essentially run 4 passing options in view of the quarterback. He easily picks the right one because it was almost impossible for the QB not to notice.


And here is another example of helping your quarterback out with design. 2x2 set. It is not mirrored concept. It is not complicated. The field wide receivers run a deep out and a deep in. Allen will throw a Touchdown to the deep out but just notice how a drag is coming into view of the quarterback from across the field. This essentially will act as a hot receiver and would be very good vs. the blitz/man look. I just appreciate as a QB that my coach is making it easy for me to see the whole picture and not cutting my picture in half.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084604984677801984

Something that emerges over Enos' years at Arkansas? His screen game is NASTY. Follow along here. They shift, they MOTION, they fake a jet sweep, they fake a dive to the left and come back and throw a screen to the right. This is sensory overload for the defense. I also appreciate Allen's ability to look natural and not do that odd screen footwork equivalent of a "pee pee" dance. Quarterbacks often have a tendency to tip off the screen with odd over accentuated footwork. Enos coaches his quarterbacks very well on screens.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084594193320824832

Here is I right football but look at how Enos will use some key busting and a semi roll to disguise a throw back screen. The left guard pulling tips run. The offensive tackles in pass pro tips pass. But no one is tipping a screen. This is a brilliantly designed screen. The offensive lineman also do a fantastic job with timing to sell the pass pro to the last second before setting up the screen. It actually will be the center and left tackle who lead the way.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084575010386259969

Enos will also get very creative with his personnel at times. When I say Arkansas lines up in 22 set personnel. That is big boy two tight ends, two running back football. That is typically countered with heavier bigger defenders and we go play in a phone booth. But when you line that personnel group up in a 3 x 1 spread shotgun set? That is one way to get slower guys out on the perimeter. Enos runs a third and short speed option for a small gain and a first but that is a prime example of using your personnel to gain an advantage by breaking formation tendency.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084576339955535872

I see some real creative plays inside the red zone. (This is Arkansas I promise, they wore those weird red uniforms at Jerry's world one year) When the quarterback identifies man, he motions the receiver back into the backfield. This will bring his defender in man coverage down onto the line of scrimmage. The receiver in the backfield carries out a zone read fake and the HB replaces the void that the wide receiver created. Easy pitch and catch.

The line from Top Gun "Where did WHO go?" pops into mind after this play. Because Texas A&M defenders are looking around at each other like "Whose man is this?" You want to help your quarterbacks passing percentage? Take the time to create plays like this instead of relying on your 71st fade ball of the season and you get better results. Great play design here inside the red zone when it matters most.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084562892177977345

Creative use of Wildcat that is hid when the quarterback is lined up as a wide receiver. You have to figure Enos will notice some of the success Deejay Dallas had in this capacity and will continue to use it. I like the wrinkle of having the X receiver MOTION for the fake. This sucks his defender inside and that leaves an open lane outside once the wildcat breaks containment.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084559342676967424

There is some RPO's noted through out various stages and here you will see a pre snap variety. The bubble is open off the pre snap look and the quarterback takes the nice gain. The motion across the formation by the H back can be used as a run blocker if they run it and naturally blocks for the bubble screen in this capacity as well. Nice little wrinkle.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084545066813800448

Common opponent. Arkansas some how lost this game after being up 24 to nothing. (Turnovers killed them) This play from I right decimated the Hokie defense right down the middle of the field. Enos had 5 offensive guys in pass options. The H back from the full back position was the recipient of this wide open touchdown. I am not necessarily the biggest fan of I right football (blame Richt for that) but it is a cog in the wheel not a staple like it was for Richt. And hard to be upset when you see results like this.

The play action sucked up the linebackers and yet again, I think this is an easy read for the Quarterback. Simply look up field and read the center of the field. The tight end brings the safety with him and it's a wrap. If the safety had stayed middle the tight end would have been wide open.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084608806926106629

In Summary. After and all day deep dive of Enos the play caller you come away with a firm understanding why Alabama wanted to keep him. He can make things increasingly difficult on a defense. When Manny Diaz said he wanted an offense that created defensive confusion he wasn't kidding with Enos. Enos biggest strength for me is his ability to use shifts, motions, multiple formations yet seamlessly make it very easy for a quarterback read wise in the passing game.

Some of the facets that plagued Miami's offense will no longer be in play. You simply cannot line up in man one or man two coverage on third down and expect to beat every mirrored route Mark Richt threw at you. Enos will kill you if you stay basic on defense. Modern day offenses need to beat you with either, formations, personnel, or tempo. I think Enos does extremely will with formations and personnel.

After having such a firm handle on Richt's offense the past three years and begrudgingly knowing what play was going to be called based off down and distance, I simply cannot get a full read on Enos yet. I watch film to find tendencies, and yes their are some, but it is nowhere near what I grew accustomed to. It seems like there was new formations, shifts, looks and plays that stood autonomous from week to week. I would say out of the 50 or so clips I posted online tonight, they all had their own story. This playbook has to be immense. Miami players on the offensive side of the ball need to start studying now. You have been warned.

It is a pro offense. I don't think you really can classify this in any shape or form as a tempo driven speed and space them out spread. It is a multiple formation driven offense that throws a lot at you and creates mental confusion for a defense with a variety of looks. Kansas City Chief like would be a good NFL comparison. But I want to focus on the tempo for a moment. While at Arkansas Enos was the 79th 55th and 110th ranked offense in terms of plays run. If there is one thing I wish he would incorporate from his time at Alabama, their tempo. Alabama ranked 10th last year in plays run. The Tide set offensive records.

And speaking of Alabama, when I transitioned my focus on Jalen Hurts and the dynamic of Enos his quarterback coach something emerged for me. If you backed up the quarterback into the shotgun, they ran a number of plays that Enos ran at Arkansas. You could tell that although he wasn't the play caller, his fingerprint was on that offense. It was clear as day. That had to be a primary reason why Saban promoted him to OC after Mike Locksley left for Maryland. Besides being able to be a great developer of quarterbacks, his influence on the offense couldn't be ignored.

Miami has a real creative force with its offensive coordinator these days. I honestly expect to see some brilliantly designed plays from week to week. There will be his core values sure. He primarily runs from a power blocking scheme and expects perfection from his quarterbacks but this offense will work here. Is the Arkansas offense exactly the offense I envisioned Miami moving to? No. But can it be super effective? Absolutely. Would I prefer a more tempo driven, post snap RPO version that Alabama ran with him as quarterback coach? Yes.

Simply because in my opinion, an Enos offense would be lethal if it operated with a bit more tempo. Last year's Bama team proved it. Defenses would not only become mentally fatigued here, they would physically melt from the pressure of this offense on a hot South Florida afternoon. Obviously you want to be game plan specific, but the year Arkansas ranked 110th in plays ran under Enos? It went 4-8. There was a lot of factors that went into that other than just tempo mind you, but this is just my initial more than likely over reaction.

Ultimately I think Miami will improve greatly on offense next year. The two tight ends, Deejay Dallas, a play making wide receiver and the quarterbacks are going to be the initial benefactors simply because they will be in positions that they haven't been in before. They will be in better position to make plays. That is because the OC actually takes the time to design the plays for them to succeed. This isn't simply an offense that relies 100% on execution any more. It is an offense that sees the bigger picture. It is an offense that provides the advantage and does not line up disadvantaged by 30 year faults.
 

DavidMiami

#LetMiamiBeMiami
Joined
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Messages
312
Great Write up,
The Fact that Enos brought in a Offensive Line Coach hes close to and has NFL Experience has me excited about getting protection and creating confusion when going up tempo. Just like Manny Diaz got his guys to run his scheme. Dan got the guys that know what Dan's About and that should pay dividends. Hopefully our players embrace the system in time for the opener.
 

Lance Roffers

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Messages
459
My man. Ro and I do not communicate beforehand so as not to influence the other on our write-ups and we both saw very similar things, which I take as a good thing for me to be seeing similar things to such a good QB analyst.

I'm in lockstep that I hope he runs a bit more of the RPO, tempo-based, check-with-me offense that we saw at Alabama this year. It's also interesting that you saw that offense being heavily influenced by Enos because I saw the same thing.

Kudos to the GOAT.
 

305to954

Senior
Joined
Jul 25, 2018
Messages
2,845
Your InSight X/O team has assembled. Like a kick ass film reading Voltron, we will learn our new Offensive Coordinator's style. This FTP will focus heavily on his most recent time as a play caller with Arkansas. A time span that was from 2015-2017. We will also dive into his time at Alabama and show some developmental clips of Jalen Hurts in a following thread. (A qb he mentored and who has admitted Miami interest) So strike up that classic eighties cartoon theme music as "I'll FORM THE HEAD!"

One of the biggest criticisms about Miami's offense in the past was its inability to have creative answers to beat press coverage and especially on third down. Enos will make things strategically difficult on defenses doing that in the future. When this play begins, the X receiver is being press covered by the Gator's boundary corner. (press not pictured) But the MOTION into a bunch formation essentially nullifies any notion of pressing the receiver.

The gator's defense is now trying to react on the fly and are trying to hand signal into a different coverage. They essentially don't communicate it properly and two receivers are wide open on third down. The quarterback Austin Allen actually missed a CROSSING route for a touchdown here but ultimately the design of the play is what manufactured the first.


Once again you'll notice how pre snap MOTION on third down will confuse Bama's defense. You'll notice Bama try to check to a coverage when they notice the motion move away from the bunch then recheck to the original call as he comes back. It's once again too late. A third down manufactured gem that easily sprung a drag for a first down. There was also a natural rub element to this play for good measure when the the lead receiver in the bunch runs his vertical.


Enos will also break another vocal complaint that Miami's offense under Mark Richt simply did not run natural counters off plays. It was a down and distance predicated offense with no building block continuity. Enos will build a big block house if you let him. Play one. Simple I left Twins right from the start. But this is 31 set personnel. Two half backs are in the I and the fullback will MOTION into the formation from twins and down block for some Big boy football. (No. It is not a fullback dive from the I)


The Very Next play. Looks identical. It starts identical. It is not Identical. I also like the quarterbacking aspect here. He carries out his play fake, sets his feet and delivers a perfect strike. This doesn't have time to set and gather. It is a bit of an off platform back foot throw that is necessary because of the need to split the window. Great play design and natural counter for six.


I want to accentuate some quarterback friendly components to this offense. Mainly Enos ability to have check downs in plain natural view of the quarterback with relation to his progressions. Here is an all vertical concept from 11 set personnel. Trips formation. The quarterback simply reads the will backer after his play fake. When the linebacker decides to attach to the #3 receiver in pass coverage, no big deal. A halfback is in view and this play is wide open when his check races into the flat.

Miami would run a ton of all vertical concepts with the halfback checking into the middle of the field. That is fine but Miami quarterbacks never consistently hit that check down. Like EVER. This is better in my opinion for a quarterback. As a play designer Enos understands the quarterback's eyes will focus on the Trips side. Let's essentially run 4 passing options in view of the quarterback. He easily picks the right one because it was almost impossible for the QB not to notice.


And here is another example of helping your quarterback out with design. 2x2 set. It is not mirrored concept. It is not complicated. The field wide receivers run a deep out and a deep in. Allen will throw a Touchdown to the deep out but just notice how a drag is coming into view of the quarterback from across the field. This essentially will act as a hot receiver and would be very good vs. the blitz/man look. I just appreciate as a QB that my coach is making it easy for me to see the whole picture and not cutting my picture in half.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084604984677801984

Something that emerges over Enos' years at Arkansas? His screen game is NASTY. Follow along here. They shift, they MOTION, they fake a jet sweep, they fake a dive to the left and come back and throw a screen to the right. This is sensory overload for the defense. I also appreciate Allen's ability to look natural and not do that odd screen footwork equivalent of a "pee pee" dance. Quarterbacks often have a tendency to tip off the screen with odd over accentuated footwork. Enos coaches his quarterbacks very well on screens.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084594193320824832

Here is I right football but look at how Enos will use some key busting and a semi roll to disguise a throw back screen. The left guard pulling tips run. The offensive tackles in pass pro tips pass. But no one is tipping a screen. This is a brilliantly designed screen. The offensive lineman also do a fantastic job with timing to sell the pass pro to the last second before setting up the screen. It actually will be the center and left tackle who lead the way.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084575010386259969

Enos will also get very creative with his personnel at times. When I say Arkansas lines up in 22 set personnel. That is big boy two tight ends, two running back football. That is typically countered with heavier bigger defenders and we go play in a phone booth. But when you line that personnel group up in a 3 x 1 spread shotgun set? That is one way to get slower guys out on the perimeter. Enos runs a third and short speed option for a small gain and a first but that is a prime example of using your personnel to gain an advantage by breaking formation tendency.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084576339955535872

I see some real creative plays inside the red zone. (This is Arkansas I promise, they wore those weird red uniforms at Jerry's world one year) When the quarterback identifies man, he motions the receiver back into the backfield. This will bring his defender in man coverage down onto the line of scrimmage. The receiver in the backfield carries out a zone read fake and the HB replaces the void that the wide receiver created. Easy pitch and catch.

The line from Top Gun "Where did WHO go?" pops into mind after this play. Because Texas A&M defenders are looking around at each other like "Whose man is this?" You want to help your quarterbacks passing percentage? Take the time to create plays like this instead of relying on your 71st fade ball of the season and you get better results. Great play design here inside the red zone when it matters most.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084562892177977345

Creative use of Wildcat that is hid when the quarterback is lined up as a wide receiver. You have to figure Enos will notice some of the success Deejay Dallas had in this capacity and will continue to use it. I like the wrinkle of having the X receiver MOTION for the fake. This sucks his defender inside and that leaves an open lane outside once the wildcat breaks containment.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084559342676967424

There is some RPO's noted through out various stages and here you will see a pre snap variety. The bubble is open off the pre snap look and the quarterback takes the nice gain. The motion across the formation by the H back can be used as a run blocker if they run it and naturally blocks for the bubble screen in this capacity as well. Nice little wrinkle.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084545066813800448

Common opponent. Arkansas some how lost this game after being up 24 to nothing. (Turnovers killed them) This play from I right decimated the Hokie defense right down the middle of the field. Enos had 5 offensive guys in pass options. The H back from the full back position was the recipient of this wide open touchdown. I am not necessarily the biggest fan of I right football (blame Richt for that) but it is a cog in the wheel not a staple like it was for Richt. And hard to be upset when you see results like this.

The play action sucked up the linebackers and yet again, I think this is an easy read for the Quarterback. Simply look up field and read the center of the field. The tight end brings the safety with him and it's a wrap. If the safety had stayed middle the tight end would have been wide open.

https://twitter.com/romancane/status/1084608806926106629

In Summary. After and all day deep dive of Enos the play caller you come away with a firm understanding why Alabama wanted to keep him. He can make things increasingly difficult on a defense. When Manny Diaz said he wanted an offense that created defensive confusion he wasn't kidding with Enos. Enos biggest strength for me is his ability to use shifts, motions, multiple formations yet seamlessly make it very easy for a quarterback read wise in the passing game.

Some of the facets that plagued Miami's offense will no longer be in play. You simply cannot line up in man one or man two coverage on third down and expect to beat every mirrored route Mark Richt threw at you. Enos will kill you if you stay basic on defense. Modern day offenses need to beat you with either, formations, personnel, or tempo. I think Enos does extremely will with formations and personnel.

After having such a firm handle on Richt's offense the past three years and begrudgingly knowing what play was going to be called based off down and distance, I simply cannot get a full read on Enos yet. I watch film to find tendencies, and yes their are some, but it is nowhere near what I grew accustomed to. It seems like there was new formations, shifts, looks and plays that stood autonomous from week to week. I would say out of the 50 or so clips I posted online tonight, they all had their own story. This playbook has to be immense. Miami players on the offensive side of the ball need to start studying now. You have been warned.

It is a pro offense. I don't think you really can classify this in any shape or form as a tempo driven speed and space them out spread. It is a multiple formation driven offense that throws a lot at you and creates mental confusion for a defense with a variety of looks. Kansas City Chief like would be a good NFL comparison. But I want to focus on the tempo for a moment. While at Arkansas Enos was the 79th 55th and 110th ranked offense in terms of plays run. If there is one thing I wish he would incorporate from his time at Alabama, their tempo. Alabama ranked 10th last year in plays run. The Tide set offensive records.

And speaking of Alabama, when I transitioned my focus on Jalen Hurts and the dynamic of Enos his quarterback coach something emerged for me. If you backed up the quarterback into the shotgun, they ran a number of plays that Enos ran at Arkansas. You could tell that although he wasn't the play caller, his fingerprint was on that offense. It was clear as day. That had to be a primary reason why Saban promoted him to OC after Mike Locksley left for Maryland. Besides being able to be a great developer of quarterbacks, his influence on the offense couldn't be ignored.

Miami has a real creative force with its offensive coordinator these days. I honestly expect to see some brilliantly designed plays from week to week. There will be his core values sure. He primarily runs from a power blocking scheme and expects perfection from his quarterbacks but this offense will work here. Is the Arkansas offense exactly the offense I envisioned Miami moving to? No. But can it be super effective? Absolutely. Would I prefer a more tempo driven, post snap RPO version that Alabama ran with him as quarterback coach? Yes.

Simply because in my opinion, an Enos offense would be lethal if it operated with a bit more tempo. Last year's Bama team proved it. Defenses would not only become mentally fatigued here, they would physically melt from the pressure of this offense on a hot South Florida afternoon. Obviously you want to be game plan specific, but the year Arkansas ranked 110th in plays ran under Enos? It went 4-8. There was a lot of factors that went into that other than just tempo mind you, but this is just my initial more than likely over reaction.

Ultimately I think Miami will improve greatly on offense next year. The two tight ends, Deejay Dallas, a play making wide receiver and the quarterbacks are going to be the initial benefactors simply because they will be in positions that they haven't been in before. They will be in better position to make plays. That is because the OC actually takes the time to design the plays for them to succeed. This isn't simply an offense that relies 100% on execution any more. It is an offense that sees the bigger picture. It is an offense that provides the advantage and does not line up disadvantaged by 30 year faults.
How many games of film did you dissect to notice any tendacies? Every play callers has them. No matter who. The trick that I’ve seen from the really great ones is like you highlighted , staying multiple and presenting different looks. With shifts, different sets, splits etc etc you can you can run the same concepts. It’s gonna be critical that we get Hurts I believe. I don’t think we have QBs who can handle what Enos wants to throw at them at this point in their development

That’s what I think did MRs O in the last 2 years. I figured it was based on what he was dealing with at the QB spot as to why the O became as predictable and simple as it did. When he had Kaaya we saw multiple looks, formations, personnel and route combos. With Malik/perry the O became simple stupid.

From what you’ve broken down, and from what we’ve seen from perry do you think he could handle and grasp the multiple playbook Enos has?
 

MedleyCane

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Messages
5,888
My man. Ro and I do not communicate beforehand so as not to influence the other on our write-ups and we both saw very similar things, which I take as a good thing for me to be seeing similar things to such a good QB analyst.

I'm in lockstep that I hope he runs a bit more of the RPO, tempo-based, check-with-me offense that we saw at Alabama this year. It's also interesting that you saw that offense being heavily influenced by Enos because I saw the same thing.

Kudos to the GOAT.
I think Roman and you are the co-Goats.
Good job fellas.
 

Canesq

Recruit
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Apr 7, 2017
Messages
286
I can’t imagine what opposing defensive coordinators thought about our offense. We had to have been a running joke. Probably took a half of a day to plan. Heck Wisconsin didn’t have to do anything.

They must have cried when news came he retired. We were so bad that any basic modern concept that attacks the defense will be a vast improvement. With an improved offense or defense should be ok since there will likely be a drop off.
 

Zbrod95

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Messages
12,627
I can’t imagine what opposing defensive coordinators thought about our offense. We had to have been a running joke. Probably took a half of a day to plan. Heck Wisconsin didn’t have to do anything.

They must have cried when news came he retired. We were so bad that any basic modern concept that attacks the defense will be a vast improvement. With an improved offense or defense should be ok since there will likely be a drop off.
You heard it from Dan Orlovsky. It was predictable and bland...bunch of mirrored concepts, misused spacings, all or nothing running game. Essentially if you could stop us up front then the O would be stagnant.
 

Roman Marciante

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Messages
508
Thank you, excellent write up. Much appreciated, @Roman Marciante
My man. Ro and I do not communicate beforehand so as not to influence the other on our write-ups and we both saw very similar things, which I take as a good thing for me to be seeing similar things to such a good QB analyst.

I'm in lockstep that I hope he runs a bit more of the RPO, tempo-based, check-with-me offense that we saw at Alabama this year. It's also interesting that you saw that offense being heavily influenced by Enos because I saw the same thing.

Kudos to the GOAT.
My man. Absolutely true. I learned from an x/o guy to not really read any other work till your own piece is done as to avoid influence.

Funny though because I finally read word for word what you wrote instead of the quick cliffs and 100% seeing this offense very similar.

When you put the run game in the negative side I was like my initial reaction of all we did was switch from zone to power became verified.

Iron sharpens iron. You lock up your side of the field. I lock up mine. But we got the whole thing under wraps. 👊
 

LuCane

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Messages
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Fantastic stuff. I'd love to hear how, from a defensive coordinator's view, you'd challenge some of his concepts. As an extension or even directly sprung from that request, wondering how you think he'll shift our OL responsibilities and method of attack.

There'll be stuff (plays, production) that looks like an easy bounce from what we saw over last few years, no doubt. But, there are still some holes to fill.
 

Roman Marciante

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Messages
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How many games of film did you dissect to notice any tendacies? Every play callers has them. No matter who. The trick that I’ve seen from the really great ones is like you highlighted , staying multiple and presenting different looks. With shifts, different sets, splits etc etc you can you can run the same concepts. It’s gonna be critical that we get Hurts I believe. I don’t think we have QBs who can handle what Enos wants to throw at them at this point in their development

That’s what I think did MRs O in the last 2 years. I figured it was based on what he was dealing with at the QB spot as to why the O became as predictable and simple as it did. When he had Kaaya we saw multiple looks, formations, personnel and route combos. With Malik/perry the O became simple stupid.

From what you’ve broken down, and from what we’ve seen from perry do you think he could handle and grasp the multiple playbook Enos has?
Today alone about 10 hours spanning multiple games over 3 years. Wanted great wins and poor losses to create a construct.

another hour or two reading philosophies, quarterback drills and watching videos on enos individually yesterday.

About 5 hours breaking down bama games and jarren at various times throughout the season

There will be tendencies that emerge for sure. But after time spent so far it is nowhere near the tendencies of richt.

This is first glance of course and doesn't make me the SME of all things enos but it gives me a good impression what to expect.

As far as Perry? I think of anyyone on the roster who will struggle with this playbook it's him. Mirrored routes were ran for a reason.
 
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