Rod Woodson: "Hall of Fame players being kept off NFL coaching staffs"

DTP

Section 102
Joined
Dec 30, 2015
Messages
6,788
Or maybe the pool of people that are qualified and actually want to do those jobs is very, very minimal?
I have a hard time believing that nobody in the coaching world is interested in high paying NFL coaching positions. It’s just that what the NFL considers “experienced” really just means “failed retread”.
 

Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
7,902
The way the NFL recycles garbage coaches from job to job is irritating. No matter how terrible you are, you can always get some kind of assistant job once you're in the coaching "club". Maybe teams need to gamble on bringing in former players for assistant positions rather than guys who have been fired from multiple jobs already.
It is truly remarkable isn't it?

Like certain CEOs (or other C-Suite Exec positions) they seem to get multiple chances at re-affirming what their previous stop had already confirmed--they aren't up to measure.

And I'm not even talking about a "championship or bust" standard. Just a consistent "make the playoffs" caliber standard seems to elude most of these re-treads.

I don't blame the coaches however; it's the owners, who most (not all obviously...looking at you Marky D) are supposedly captains of other industries and "good" decision makers.
 
Last edited:

305407cane

Senior
Joined
Feb 25, 2018
Messages
4,044
A lot of these players were smart but had overwhelming athleticism. Coaches have to be overwhelmingly smart usually to be successful. That’s why a guy like Steve Kerr is a good coach because to make it in the league he had to be smart and grind. He didn’t have Jordan’s hops or 7’ height. Although I respect pat Ewing’s trajectory he’s worked his way up sort of slowly through the ranks
 

The Svengali

Sophomore
Joined
Aug 23, 2015
Messages
2,337
A lot of these players were smart but had overwhelming athleticism. Coaches have to be overwhelmingly smart usually to be successful. That’s why a guy like Steve Kerr is a good coach because to make it in the league he had to be smart and grind. He didn’t have Jordan’s hops or 7’ height. Although I respect pat Ewing’s trajectory he’s worked his way up sort of slowly through the ranks
In other words, marginal athletes that stick, make better coaches because they work harder and are smarter than great athletes. Got it! Good to know!
 

JD08

He don't cause trouble. He don't bother nobody.
Joined
Dec 19, 2014
Messages
10,144
It is truly remarkable isn't it?

Like certain CEOs (or other C-Suite Exec positions) they seem to get multiple chances at re-affirming what their previous stop had already confirmed--they aren't up to measure.

And I'm not even talking about a "championship or bust" standard. Just a consistent "make the playoffs" caliber standard seems to elude most of these re-treads.

I don't blame the coaches however; it's the owners, who most (not all obviously...looking at you Marky D) are supposedly captains of other industries and "good" decision makers.
The rule of thumb is to never bash management at a previous job, but that's one of those rules that gets reversed when you go high enough.
 

RedSquare

Freshman
Joined
Jan 30, 2013
Messages
1,686
I dont fully agree. There are very few successful head coaches, in any sport, that were HOF players. Being a great player is not the same as being a great motivator, teacher, planner, manager, etc. In football, none of Brown, Halas, Lombardi, Landry, Shula, Belichick, JJ, etc. were great or even good players. Casey Stengel wasnt, Sparky Anderson, etc etc. Red Auerbach, Phil Jackson, Riley, Poppovich, etc etc.
this.

the assumption that: "Great Player = Great Coach" is about as far off the mark as a bubba baxa
 
Top