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CANEMC

Sophomore
Joined
Jan 25, 2017
Messages
3,586
When a recruit calls Miami Hurricane coaches and commits, a phone call quickly goes out.

It’s not to athletic director Blake James.

Or a particular assistant coach.

It’s to a first-year behind-the-scenes wizard most fans are unaware exists.

Creative Coordinator Dominque Nwoko is the Oz behind the orange-and-green curtain that creates Twitter commitment graphics for recruits to use with their public announcement.

No, do not call them “edits.” They are graphics. Or art.

Take your choice.

“People call them `edits,’ I won’t correct people but I do prefer to call them `graphics' because I think there’s a difference between graphics and edits,” said Nwoko, who majored in art at the University of Georgia and previously worked at UGA as Coordinator of Creative Design. “I feel edits are like - I can edit a graphic, make changes to a graphic. Edits have the notion of being these quick, really easy, churn-outable things, and I was an art major in school so I see what I make as a piece of art. … I see what I do as art, it is art.”

Nwoko says she’ll get calls as late as 10 p.m. with commitments coming in … and she can usually get an individualized graphic done within an hour-and-half or so.

“Some of the committed graphics take a long time because it’s a lot of searching for pictures,” Nwoko said. “You want to be satisfied with what you’re putting out, have other people satisfied with what they’re getting. But you want to do it in a really, really quick time frame. It might be `Okay, so and so is going to commit,’ so I get a call at whatever time and make something. `He’s going to commit in the next hour.’ `Okay, I’ve got this.’ And you zoom in on your computer trying to make it as personalized as possible.”

"Graphics take a long time to make, sometimes it might be two or three hours on a template, depending on what you’re doing,” said Nwoko, who also has interns she trains that help with cutouts and the like. “But sometimes one of the recruiting staff or coaches will have a really grand idea and want me to execute it, and it might be an entire day I’m working on a template for that.

“I don’t want to make something that they don’t want, so I’ll run ideas by them beforehand or have them come to me with `I know this kid likes this, can you make something like that for him?’ `Okay, I’ve got you.’ So it’s more me checking with them immediately before I start an idea because I don’t want to miss the mark.”

Of course, sometimes concepts are simply scrapped.

“It’s trial and error - sometimes I get an idea, it doesn’t work so I have to scrap it because I don’t want to waste time,” Nwoko said. “I have to look for pictures, color-correct things because I might get 20 pictures and none of them match so I have to match them all before I start, then piece it together right. There’s a lot that goes into it.”
 

Kansas Cane

Freshman
Joined
May 25, 2019
Messages
262
When a recruit calls Miami Hurricane coaches and commits, a phone call quickly goes out.

It’s not to athletic director Blake James.

Or a particular assistant coach.

It’s to a first-year behind-the-scenes wizard most fans are unaware exists.

Creative Coordinator Dominque Nwoko is the Oz behind the orange-and-green curtain that creates Twitter commitment graphics for recruits to use with their public announcement.

No, do not call them “edits.” They are graphics. Or art.

Take your choice.

“People call them `edits,’ I won’t correct people but I do prefer to call them `graphics' because I think there’s a difference between graphics and edits,” said Nwoko, who majored in art at the University of Georgia and previously worked at UGA as Coordinator of Creative Design. “I feel edits are like - I can edit a graphic, make changes to a graphic. Edits have the notion of being these quick, really easy, churn-outable things, and I was an art major in school so I see what I make as a piece of art. … I see what I do as art, it is art.”

Nwoko says she’ll get calls as late as 10 p.m. with commitments coming in … and she can usually get an individualized graphic done within an hour-and-half or so.

“Some of the committed graphics take a long time because it’s a lot of searching for pictures,” Nwoko said. “You want to be satisfied with what you’re putting out, have other people satisfied with what they’re getting. But you want to do it in a really, really quick time frame. It might be `Okay, so and so is going to commit,’ so I get a call at whatever time and make something. `He’s going to commit in the next hour.’ `Okay, I’ve got this.’ And you zoom in on your computer trying to make it as personalized as possible.”

"Graphics take a long time to make, sometimes it might be two or three hours on a template, depending on what you’re doing,” said Nwoko, who also has interns she trains that help with cutouts and the like. “But sometimes one of the recruiting staff or coaches will have a really grand idea and want me to execute it, and it might be an entire day I’m working on a template for that.

“I don’t want to make something that they don’t want, so I’ll run ideas by them beforehand or have them come to me with `I know this kid likes this, can you make something like that for him?’ `Okay, I’ve got you.’ So it’s more me checking with them immediately before I start an idea because I don’t want to miss the mark.”

Of course, sometimes concepts are simply scrapped.

“It’s trial and error - sometimes I get an idea, it doesn’t work so I have to scrap it because I don’t want to waste time,” Nwoko said. “I have to look for pictures, color-correct things because I might get 20 pictures and none of them match so I have to match them all before I start, then piece it together right. There’s a lot that goes into it.”
Interesting stuff. Hoping Brashard’ is in the works :)
 
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