US weekly jobless claims soar to a record-breaking 3.28 million, vs 1.5 million expected

For_The_U

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What if it wasn't an elderly loved one? Child, wife , brother or sister would that change your mind?
Change my mind on what? Would me losing a younger beloved family member to coronavirus (instead of, say, my mom, who is the person I am most concerned about right now) make me feel we need to keep the country locked down until a vaccine is released? No, it would not. I would not support keeping our country locked down until a vaccine was released unless the situation before us (society) clearly warranted such.
 
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Poptimus

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Emotionally, sure. And maybe we should get back to work soon, let's see what the numbers bear out once we have some reliable data and can start to determine which models we should be following from a policy perspective.

But this analogy misses a critical distinction between death via a communicable and highly contagious disease and death via car accident.

If an immediate family member of mine dies in a car accident, it has no impact whatsoever on the likelihood of me dying in a car accident (unless I'm in the car). If an immediate family member of mine dies via coronavirus, it can have a direct impact on my likelihood of contracting (and even dying from) coronavirus (depending on my level of exposure to that family member). And if I hurry back to work, I might likewise put others at risk.

These things aren't the same. We can have an honest discussion about whether and when it is appropriate to start easing government restrictions on travel/operating businesses/etc..., but to do so we should keep in mind the unique characteristics of this circumstance.
You’re right, I am not attempting to equate dying in a car accident with dying from coronavirus. I am trying to illustrate that certain activities inherently involve some degree of assumption of risk. Personally, I am comfortable with the risk associated with getting back to work on a more aggressive timetable than the medical professionals recommend. If that means I might contract the virus and even die from it, that is a risk I am willing to take.

A bigger risk to me would be to have the economy enter a depression and all that entails: looting, rioting, suicides, heart attacks, strokes, etc. It is pick your poison, but the latter outcome is 100% assured if we carry on in this capacity for months.
 

Dutch

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Feb 7, 2017
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I HATE getting a cold. Haven't had the flu - knock on wood - in years. I'm not a germaphobe, but for years I've taken measures to help me keep from getting either. I grab a door handle in places that others may not; most public latrines and toilets have sensors that flush when you walk away but for those that don't, I use my elbow. I push a door open with my elbow. Little things like these can no doubt help not only during this pandemic, but also in our daily lives going forward.
The worry in flushing a public toilet isn't/shouldn't be in touching the handle, it's the mist that is created by the flushing action. You can't see or feel it but all the germs come flying back at you. It's like kissing a girl that sucked 10,000 cocks, you might as well suck them too.
 

No_Fly_Zone

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Dec 28, 2016
Messages
3,300
You’re right, I am not attempting to equate dying in a car accident with dying from coronavirus. I am trying to illustrate that certain activities inherently involve some degree of assumption of risk. Personally, I am comfortable with the risk associated with getting back to work on a more aggressive timetable than the medical professionals recommend. If that means I might contract the virus and even die from it, that is a risk I am willing to take.

A bigger risk to me would be to have the economy enter a depression and all that entails: looting, rioting, suicides, heart attacks, strokes, etc. It is pick your poison, but the latter outcome is 100% assured if we carry on in this capacity for months.
I understand your point, and it is well taken. But, can you (or I) assume that risk for everyone else at this point? Mind you, I ask as someone who is literally returning to the office tomorrow after working remotely the last two weeks (apparently, attorneys are "essential," though I know many people who would disagree with that characterization). There's no easy answer.

I'm also less than 100% certain there will be looting, rioting, and mass suicides (or more suicides than normal, outside maybe the healthcare workers, many of whom seem to be struggling right now) if this goes on for another couple of months. On a long enough timeline, it could definitely happen. But, I also sincerely doubt we'll ever be there unless the virus is much more serious and deadly than most people currently believe.

Either way, I am hopeful we should have enough information available in the next week or two to allow for better forecasting and weighing of the cost/benefit of easing restrictions. In the meantime, we should also be looking at creative ways to minimize the spread of coronavirus while still remaining as productive as possible. Certain industries are probably utterly stuck (hospitality, for one), but there have to be ways to get people working (relatively) safely and while minimizing the risk of contagion.
 

NateDogg

G-Funk Era
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Oct 15, 2012
Messages
1,507
anyone with the ability to work needs to do so. If you are scared, wash your hands. The US is a fucking ghost town right now, and it is insulting to anyone that got laid off if your work is essential and you don’t take it. @NateDogg thats a sad situation, what is the general age group of the employees you are describing?
Agreed.

In our shop the general age is 30-55. 2 guys in their 20s and 1 guy in his 60s. Company is 96 years old. Our longest tenured employee started in 1969.
 

For_The_U

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I understand your point, and it is well taken. But, can you (or I) assume that risk for everyone else at this point? Mind you, I ask as someone who is literally returning to the office tomorrow after working remotely the last two weeks (apparently, attorneys are "essential," though I know many people who would disagree with that characterization). There's no easy answer.

I'm also less than 100% certain there will be looting, rioting, and mass suicides (or more suicides than normal, outside maybe the healthcare workers, many of whom seem to be struggling right now) if this goes on for another couple of months. On a long enough timeline, it could definitely happen. But, I also sincerely doubt we'll ever be there unless the virus is much more serious and deadly than most people currently believe.

Either way, I am hopeful we should have enough information available in the next week or two to allow for better forecasting and weighing of the cost/benefit of easing restrictions. In the meantime, we should also be looking at creative ways to minimize the spread of coronavirus while still remaining as productive as possible. Certain industries are probably utterly stuck (hospitality, for one), but there have to be ways to get people working (relatively) safely and while minimizing the risk of contagion.
Great post.

Did you just say attorneys are considered essential?!?

yes gif.gif
 

tcgrad1014

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Nov 5, 2011
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11,066
The worry in flushing a public toilet isn't/shouldn't be in touching the handle, it's the mist that is created by the flushing action. You can't see or feel it but all the germs come flying back at you. It's like kissing a girl that sucked 10,000 cocks, you might as well suck them too.
I don't know what your point is, but that was the single most disgusting post I have read in a long time.
 

Poptimus

Senior
Joined
Nov 4, 2017
Messages
3,175
I understand your point, and it is well taken. But, can you (or I) assume that risk for everyone else at this point? Mind you, I ask as someone who is literally returning to the office tomorrow after working remotely the last two weeks (apparently, attorneys are "essential," though I know many people who would disagree with that characterization). There's no easy answer.

I'm also less than 100% certain there will be looting, rioting, and mass suicides (or more suicides than normal, outside maybe the healthcare workers, many of whom seem to be struggling right now) if this goes on for another couple of months. On a long enough timeline, it could definitely happen. But, I also sincerely doubt we'll ever be there unless the virus is much more serious and deadly than most people currently believe.

Either way, I am hopeful we should have enough information available in the next week or two to allow for better forecasting and weighing of the cost/benefit of easing restrictions. In the meantime, we should also be looking at creative ways to minimize the spread of coronavirus while still remaining as productive as possible. Certain industries are probably utterly stuck (hospitality, for one), but there have to be ways to get people working (relatively) safely and while minimizing the risk of contagion.
Are you a DA or PD by any chance? And are you in Florida?

I am also an attorney and I am working from home indefinitely. There have been 5 reported cases in my building alone where I work in Manhattan. Each case was on a different floor, but we use the same elevators and main doors. They have taken the position to email us about new cases each day and I learned of a new case yesterday and another case the day before. I suspect I will hear of several more cases and be working from home (if I can keep my job, fingers crossed) for at least another month. I haven’t been in the office in 14 days, so I trust I’m safe from these infected coworkers. But if my building had no suspected cases and I was in Florida, I’d be fine going into the office with gloves and avoiding contact with others within 6 feet of me.
 

Fawk_U Haters

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Jan 11, 2015
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Another dude who thinks we should all go to work now, but furloughing tens of thousands of employees. I find it funny people like this want everyone else to sacrifice, but they themselves are unwilling to share in the sacrifice to save the economy.

 

No_Fly_Zone

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Dec 28, 2016
Messages
3,300
Are you a DA or PD by any chance? And are you in Florida?

I am also an attorney and I am working from home indefinitely. There have been 5 reported cases in my building alone where I work in Manhattan. Each case was on a different floor, but we use the same elevators and main doors. They have taken the position to email us about new cases each day and I learned of a new case yesterday and another case the day before. I suspect I will hear of several more cases and be working from home (if I can keep my job, fingers crossed) for at least another month. I haven’t been in the office in 14 days, so I trust I’m safe from these infected coworkers. But if my building had no suspected cases and I was in Florida, I’d be fine going into the office with gloves and avoiding contact with others within 6 feet of me.
Florida civil litigator in private practice. No confirmed cases reported in my building... at least not yet. The risk (at least here) feels manageable, IMO.

But my friend, if I was working in Manhattan, it'd be very difficult to get me into the office tomorrow. Stay safe (and hopefully employed) out there!
 

motorcitycane

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Dec 10, 2012
Messages
6,078
Not going to hold y'all up I'm like 70% of the way on saying send everybody back to work.

30% of me is like shut the whole **** down and take the economic hit.

I'm not going to pretend I've done all the research on the virus. I've been busy with my work which is all online. So I really personally haven't noticed anything.

But last I read (admittedly a while back) was something about the virus being airborne and can remain airborne hours after the infected have left an area.

That information could have been false. But assuming that the information is true I don't see how you stop something like that regardless of how much you sanitize.

I don't know about you guys but NEVER in my life has a person sneezed on me and I've always been fairly clean in the hygiene department. I've been in some of the busiest cities in the world regularly. If it's true that it's an airborne virus there's pretty much no containing it without a complete LOCKDOWN including grocery stores.

I just went grocery shopping today and lol at the signs of "staying 6 feet away" like that's going to help if the shyt is in the air. People don't go around touching me or running up on me in life anyway. This shyt is like no big difference.

Fatality rate seems low across most countries (a few exceptions)

If it starts to get really crazy then we'd have no choice but to take the economic hit and lockdown EVERYTHING.

Right now we need people to get working before they get desperate and crazy....many have already been desperate and crazy who have been fired or laid off already.

We all come from different socioeconomic backgrounds on this website. I know for a fact what coming up in poverty in the city of Detroit it like. I know the type of shyt I've seen economically depressed and disadvantaged do with my own eyes. A few more weeks (NOT EVEN MONTHS) like this and you gone need to have guns in your house because if some of y'all who came up in middle-class or upper-class families going to be turning to the darkside to provide for y'all families.

That's some shyt I don't want to see on a nationwide scale.
 

423Hurricane

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Feb 1, 2018
Messages
3,662
What is your acceptable number of deaths?
I don’t think a finite number can be determined now or even in the near term. Obviously, the least possible without destroying millions of other lives with a continued shut down.
 

Empirical Cane

We are what we repeatedly do.
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
6,167
You're right, it's only the democrats in on this. The Republicans that shut down their cities and states, they must've been coerced.
Can you name a single Republican who has shut down their state or city?

I'm fully prepared to take the L on this.

I'm seriously too lazy to look it up.
 
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