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Millennial age group, 25 to 44 experienced an 84% increase in excess mortality.

Suhrthing

Recruit
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Sep 17, 2016
Messages
6,341
Millennial age group, 25 to 44 experienced an 84% increase in excess mortality.

Based on CDC data, helluva correlation.



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Dan E. Dangerously

This board...it's my note
Maude
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Nov 3, 2011
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13,730
I never keep up with these classifications, is 25 to 44 really a millennial?
Last I heard born in 1965-1980 was Gen X. That would make 41 the upper limit.
Yeah it varies, but in general people born in '80/'81 to '95/'96 are considered millennial. So if you're, 40 like me, you are an upper end millennial or lower end Gen X. It's only wikipedia, but it's decent enough breakdown of the generations and how/why they got their names.


What's funny to me, is that as millenials get older (entering 40s), people still reflexively sh!t on them as dumb young people, when in reality they are talking about Gen Z (Zoomers), or even Alphas (the children of Millennials). The same way people sh!t on Gen X in the 90's and boomers in the late 60s.
 
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JD08

Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc
Maude
Joined
Dec 19, 2014
Messages
24,001
Yeah it varies, but in general people born in '80/'81 to '95/'96 are considered millennial. So if you're, 40 like me, you are an upper end millennial or lower end Gen X. It's only wikipedia, but it's decent enough breakdown of the generations and how/why they got their names.

I'm going to stick with 1980 being the cutoff as my wife was born in 1980. If you'd like to tell her she's considereed a millenial by some, I'll be happy to let you. Just tell us where to send the flowers afterward.
 

OriginalCanesCanesCanes

All-ACC (#1 most reproted porster on CIS)
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I’ve always wondered why these breakdowns? Seriously. Do they think and act like a group? I mean I just sort of accept them, mainly because of their constant use in popular culture and media, and I know people are always constantly bltching about this generation or that generation, for example “OK boomer“, but what does it really mean?

I mean if somebody could point me to a sociological study or survey or poll that would indicate that there are distinct demonstrable differences between the so-called groups then my interest level would increase to more than just mild annoyance at nebulous references.

I’m not complaining about anyone using these terms here, it’s just commonly used, but I just always have been somewhat quizzical about these apparent but undefined generational distinctions.
 

Dan E. Dangerously

This board...it's my note
Maude
Joined
Nov 3, 2011
Messages
13,730
I’ve always wondered why these breakdowns? Seriously. Do they think and act like a group? I mean I just sort of accept them, mainly because of their constant use in popular culture and media, and I know people are always constantly bltching about this generation or that generation, for example “OK boomer“, but what does it really mean?

I mean if somebody could point me to a sociological study or survey or poll that would indicate that there are distinct demonstrable differences between the so-called groups then my interest level would increase to more than just mild annoyance at nebulous references.

I’m not complaining about anyone using these terms here, it’s just commonly used, but I just always have been somewhat quizzical about these apparent but undefined generational distinctions.
I agree it is silly, but it's just a way for journalist, historians, economists, and other academics to describe the general public during specific eras because they make up the workforce and electorate of those times. They're generally applied to reflect the times people grew up in, because that era's economic/political situation effected their early life the most. The names can come from anything. For instance, the "Lost Generation" applies to people who were young adults when WWI, Spanish Flu, and the Great Depression started, their generation is defined as being upended before it could really get started, caused massive amounts of poverty, and lowered birth rates (Silent Generation). The "Greatest Generation" is taken straight from Brokaw's book, and I think it's pretty apt.
 
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Dan E. Dangerously

This board...it's my note
Maude
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Hard times make people strong - Greatest Generation.
Strong people create prosperity - Baby Boomers.
Prosperity brings about weakness - Millenials.
Weakness creates hard times - Coming soon.
I would argue the tag line for Boomers belongs as the 2nd half of the Greatest Generation, and the other two taglines belong on the Boomer line. Boomers were handed everything (when compared to their parents and Grandparents), and have been in charge for the past 20 to 30 years.
 

NC_Canes_11

All American
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
10,865
Hard times make people strong - Greatest Generation.
Strong people create prosperity - Baby Boomers.
Prosperity brings about weakness - Millenials.
Weakness creates hard times - Coming soon.
Prosperity brings about weakness, but so does bad or lack of parenting. I’ve noticed that boomers are the best parents ever, or the worst. A large portion of them failed.
 
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