• Attention: Register today to view CanesInSight Ad-Free for 7 days.

NFL Amazon gets EXCLUSIVE rights to NFL Thursday Night Football

OriginalCanesCanesCanes

All-ACC (#1 most reproted porster on CIS)
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
23,609
So who gives a shlt?

Well maybe a few people do that follow business in general, either for investment reasons or just because the sports broadcasting market is of interest to us (obviously is a huge part of college football), the ACC ESPN/SEC etc. etc.

What is of particular interest here, is that according to reports Amazon Prime Video is an exclusive partner for Thursday Night Football. CNBC says “It’s the first time a streaming service will carry a full package of games exclusively”

So it’s a first for a streaming service.

Amazon paid a measly $1 billion for the rights, and I say that in all seriousness. $1 billion is nothing to Amazon if the ROI on this is what I think it could be for them, as a result ofgreater acceptance of their streaming service to the general public. A few share points in this market are worth a lot of money.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/18/nfl-media-rights-deal-2023-2033-amazon-gets-exclusive-thursday-night.html?__source=google|editorspicks|&par=google

With respect to college football, how soon before there is an exclusive deal or some form of deal of games for an evening game every week, or a bundled conference packages maybe, with one of the streaming services. Exclusivity are no exclusivity.

Just interested in some ideas as to what anyone thinks might be coming next
 

Beatles_1

Recruit
Joined
Jan 31, 2014
Messages
93
Good stuff.

Is the Pac 12 the next to redo their deal? I think the SEC deal has been inked right?

I could see an exclusive streaming package come out of the Pac 12 deal since their exposure is so limited at the moment.
 
Joined
Nov 10, 2011
Messages
823
Good move for Amazon definitely and the $1billion investment will be helped out by the increased subscriptions and subsequent rate hike (you know it's coming). If it happens in college football, it'll be interesting to see what conference will be the first.
On another note, did anyone see Michigan St. now being called Michigan St. Presented by Quicken Loans or something like that? SIAP
 

OriginalCanesCanesCanes

All-ACC (#1 most reproted porster on CIS)
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
23,609
Good stuff.

Is the Pac 12 the next to redo their deal? I think the SEC deal has been inked right?

I could see an exclusive streaming package come out of the Pac 12 deal since their exposure is so limited at the moment.

Actually, if I had to do the odds I would give them a slight advantage as being the first conference to do something like this. And maybe this point it’s just a little bit too superficial, but they are on the West Coast and just geographically closer to everything.
 

TheOriginalCane

All American
Joined
Dec 22, 2011
Messages
13,580
So who gives a shlt?

Well maybe a few people do that follow business in general, either for investment reasons or just because the sports broadcasting market is of interest to us (obviously is a huge part of college football), the ACC ESPN/SEC etc. etc.

What is of particular interest here, is that according to reports Amazon Prime Video is an exclusive partner for Thursday Night Football. CNBC says “It’s the first time a streaming service will carry a full package of games exclusively”

So it’s a first for a streaming service.

Amazon paid a measly $1 billion for the rights, and I say that in all seriousness. $1 billion is nothing to Amazon if the ROI on this is what I think it could be for them, as a result ofgreater acceptance of their streaming service to the general public. A few share points in this market are worth a lot of money.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/18/nfl-media-rights-deal-2023-2033-amazon-gets-exclusive-thursday-night.html?__source=google|editorspicks|&par=google

With respect to college football, how soon before there is an exclusive deal or some form of deal of games for an evening game every week, or a bundled conference packages maybe, with one of the streaming services. Exclusivity are no exclusivity.

Just interested in some ideas as to what anyone thinks might be coming next

I know this will take things in a bit of a different direction, but...

I think we are going to see a "re-convergence" at some point on the technology side.

Let's think about this. Apple and Amazon are sitting on MASSIVE amounts of money. They have currently invested a ton of money into content. They stream this content through little boxes running between $25 and $200.

If I'm the CEO of either Apple or Amazon, it seems like the next logical progression is to break off some of that money to buy (or merge with) a TV manufacturer (and as you point out, a billion dollars is sofa-cushion-change to Amazon). Let's say that Apple does a merger with, say, Toshiba (or maybe just a joint venture). Then, the Apple TV box is bundled into the TV in a seamless fashion. You go out and buy ACTUAL Apple Televisions, that already come complete with the Apple TV streaming platform. Due to Apple's affiliation with Disney, you give ABC and ESPN and all their other networks a prime spot in the channel lineup. Then you charge EVERYONE ELSE the carriage fee that (currently) cable operators are collecting.

What's the strategy? As we all know, cable companies have regional monopolies or semi-monopolies. There have been ongoing fights between cable companies and content providers, at times resulting in the blockage of certain channels (usually for a short period of time). If you have companies like Apple and Amazon which are invested in the entire life-cycle, from content creation to in-home broadcast, and you are able to cut out the middle-man of cable companies, you either "provide content to subscribers more cheaply" (feel free to laugh at this point) or you retain more of the profits for yourself (ah, now we're getting somewhere).

Then, all of this "televised" content can be brought into everyone's home (or portable devices) on a US/global level without the (antiquated) need to go through old-fashioned coaxial cable. Once you start cutting that whole "but we invested millions to install cable running to everyone's home" nonsense, then you can finally embrace modern delivery methods. For a while, there will still be issues with internet service delivery, as there is currently a healthy mix of coaxial, telephone, and satellite forms of delivery, but if the US ever pulls its head out of its ass and delivers country-wide WiFi, then the ISP issue starts to go away.

The main thing to be aware of is C.R.E.A.M. And that Apple and Amazon have so much motherfvckin' cash, that it only seems like a matter of time until those companies (and a few others) rule everything around you. All they have to do is buy a few more links in the chain. Is it antitrust? Of course it is, but the US seems disinclined to get tough on antitrust at this point. We are rapidly moving to a "but does it make my life easier" standard for tolerating corporate ownership of things that, in past decades and centuries, would be feared/fought.

Fvck rabbit ears. Fvck coaxial. In a few years, you might be getting your entire "cable" television programming via streaming. And rather than have 5 streaming boxes and 25 separate streaming subscriptions, there will almost certainly be some "consolidation" along the way.

C.R.E.A.M. Dolla dolla bill, y'all.
 
Last edited:

RozayCane

DelrayZoe🇭🇹
Joined
Sep 9, 2013
Messages
540
1 billi is shoe box money for Jeff Peso.. they’ll make that back in a few months.

Great investment.
 

HurricaneU

American Patriot
Joined
Jan 28, 2013
Messages
2,785
1616104232011.png
 

kgranger17

Data Driven
Joined
Nov 11, 2013
Messages
2,121
I think Streaming has gone too crazy. 15 years ago, consumers had a one stop shop to watch their favorite programs.

Consumers WILL NOT SUBSCRIBE if too much politic'n is going on. "You mean I really have to put my card in for 7 different micro-services?"

If it's not readily available, if it's too much work, Americans just won't do it.


TOC, above, talked about the consolidation. OP, you mentioned Amazon.


Amazon is the clear winner in allowing consumers to subscribe, and then "SET IT AND FORGET IT!" :)

Strictly due to convenience, Amazon will overtake any other in 10 years. Notice the NFL signed the most recent contracts for 10 years. Just in time for Amazon's expected window of country-wide adoption.
 

Zmoney

7th Year Senior
Joined
Sep 5, 2016
Messages
2,093
Great move by Amazon. What aside from sports do people truly feel compelled to watch live? I oftentimes hear "I only have cable for sports"

Weaken the cable companies, differentiate your offering from your streaming competitors, bring in a new audience/demo and pay for the rights to host the content instead of spending on advertising dollars.
 

Babscanes

Freshman
Joined
Oct 15, 2018
Messages
120
Great move by Amazon. What aside from sports do people truly feel compelled to watch live? I oftentimes hear "I only have cable for sports"

Weaken the cable companies, differentiate your offering from your streaming competitors, bring in a new audience/demo and pay for the rights to host the content instead of spending on advertising dollars.
Bingo. Sports are the only thing keeping cable alive. I cut the cord and only subscribe during football season for games. Saves hundreds a year if not more
 

UMinati

Sovereign
Joined
Apr 21, 2013
Messages
2,866
This was part of my argument for UM moving to the AAC. You grab a couple schools from big media markets and you do something revolutionary with Apple, Netflix or Amazon. Yet an all Miami channel 24/7 - all games, player shows, exclusive content, NFTs, etc.

The mayor of Miami is also in support of crypto currency so we should be offering our players payments in Bitcoin...
you know, E-BAGS. Let’s do something really Miami and disrupt everything NCAA.
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
1,346
I know this will take things in a bit of a different direction, but...

I think we are going to see a "re-convergence" at some point on the technology side.

Let's think about this. Apple and Amazon are sitting on MASSIVE amounts of money. They have currently invested a ton of money into content. They stream this content through little boxes running between $25 and $200.

If I'm the CEO of either Apple or Amazon, it seems like the next logical progression is to break off some of that money to buy (or merge with) a TV manufacturer (and as you point out, a billion dollars is sofa-cushion-change to Amazon). Let's say that Apple does a merger with, say, Toshiba (or maybe just a joint venture). Then, the Apple TV box is bundled into the TV in a seamless fashion. You go out and buy ACTUAL Apple Televisions, that already come complete with the Apple TV streaming platform. Due to Apple's affiliation with Disney, you give ABC and ESPN and all their other networks a prime spot in the channel lineup. Then you charge EVERYONE ELSE the carriage fee that (currently) cable operators are collecting.

What's the strategy? As we all know, cable companies have regional monopolies or semi-monopolies. There have been ongoing fights between cable companies and content providers, at times resulting in the blockage of certain channels (usually for a short period of time). If you have companies like Apple and Amazon which are invested in the entire life-cycle, from content creation to in-home broadcast, and you are able to cut out the middle-man of cable companies, you either "provide content to subscribers more cheaply" (feel free to laugh at this point) or you retain more of the profits for yourself (ah, now we're getting somewhere).

Then, all of this "televised" content can be brought into everyone's home (or portable devices) on a US/global level without the (antiquated) need to go through old-fashioned coaxial cable. Once you start cutting that whole "but we invested millions to install cable running to everyone's home" nonsense, then you can finally embrace modern delivery methods. For a while, there will still be issues with internet service delivery, as there is currently a healthy mix of coaxial, telephone, and satellite forms of delivery, but if the US ever pulls its head out of its ass and delivers country-wide WiFi, then the ISP issue starts to go away.

The main thing to be aware of is C.R.E.A.M. And that Apple and Amazon have so much motherfvckin' cash, that it only seems like a matter of time until those companies (and a few others) rule everything around you. All they have to do is buy a few more links in the chain. Is it antitrust? Of course it is, but the US seems disinclined to get tough on antitrust at this point. We are rapidly moving to a "but does it make my life easier" standard for tolerating corporate ownership of things that, in past decades and centuries, would be feared/fought.

Fvck rabbit ears. Fvck coaxial. In a few years, you might be getting your entire "cable" television programming via streaming. And rather than have 5 streaming boxes and 25 separate streaming subscriptions, there will almost certainly be some "consolidation" along the way.

C.R.E.A.M. Dolla dolla bill, y'all.

There has been a rumor of an Apple Television for the better part of a decade already. It's like... the oldest slightly still possible tech rumor there is. Way older than the Apple Car.

The TV industry is maybe the best example of commodification there is across "tech." It's a cut-throat blood sport where price is 90% of the game. Hard to generate the margins Apple is accustomed to.

There are better ways to skin this cat besides spending billions of dollars on a shitty company with slim margins.
 

TheOriginalCane

All American
Joined
Dec 22, 2011
Messages
13,580
There has been a rumor of an Apple Television for the better part of a decade already. It's like... the oldest slightly still possible tech rumor there is. Way older than the Apple Car.

The TV industry is maybe the best example of commodification there is across "tech." It's a cut-throat blood sport where price is 90% of the game. Hard to generate the margins Apple is accustomed to.

There are better ways to skin this cat besides spending billions of dollars on a shitty company with slim margins.


I'm fully aware of what current TV margins are. But, again, I was talking about a transformative TV product which would be less reliant upon coaxial input, and would be more of a streaming aggregator without the need to purchase a separate stand-alone product.

Additionally, Apple has managed to charge (and get) a price premium on such commodities as desktop computers, laptops, telephones, tablets, headphones, and watches. So, yeah, not impossible. And part of the overall strategy of producing hardware for anything that involves a video screen and/or sound.

And, as has already been mentioned, Apple has money to burn.

But, hey, it's always funny to watch "really smart guys" trying to be skeptical of the ideas of others, as they try to nitpick the direction of the future by focusing on the present and recent past. Thank goodness you never had the ear of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, otherwise you would have tried to convince them of the stupidity of all their great ideas.
 

OriginalCanesCanesCanes

All-ACC (#1 most reproted porster on CIS)
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
23,609
....TV product which would be less reliant upon coaxial input, and would be more of a streaming aggregator without the need to purchase a separate stand-alone product....

You brought up some interesting discussion topics, the product you describe here, as you know Apple makes already - the Apple TV box - which will connect to any television. I have more to say about Apple/TV company, but long day and just no time right now.
 
Joined
Oct 2, 2017
Messages
1,346
I'm fully aware of what current TV margins are. But, again, I was talking about a transformative TV product which would be less reliant upon coaxial input, and would be more of a streaming aggregator without the need to purchase a separate stand-alone product.

Additionally, Apple has managed to charge (and get) a price premium on such commodities as desktop computers, laptops, telephones, tablets, headphones, and watches. So, yeah, not impossible. And part of the overall strategy of producing hardware for anything that involves a video screen and/or sound.

And, as has already been mentioned, Apple has money to burn.

But, hey, it's always funny to watch "really smart guys" trying to be skeptical of the ideas of others, as they try to nitpick the direction of the future by focusing on the present and recent past. Thank goodness you never had the ear of Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, otherwise you would have tried to convince them of the stupidity of all their great ideas.

Yes, thank goodness I or other "really smart guys" weren't around to try to talk Steve Jobs out of sticking a streaming stick inside of a TV. Or from buying... Toshiba. :ibis-roflmao-sm3: Oh my, where would the world be today if I had tackled Steve Jobs on the way into that "merger meeting":zczkqmritjdsoaq.jpg:with TOSHIBA (that never happened)??? Do you even know anything about them and their problems? Toshiba, lol. You went there. If you did, you'd be laughing at yourself the way I am laughing at you. Anyway, we'd never have had... oh wait, Apple decided not to make TV's. Ever. They've even got back and forth on monitors for desktops. Barely interested. For all the reasons I stated and more. Because duh. But please, more incredibly innovative ideas. Keep them coming.

It's also adorable that you think Apple makes "desktop computers, laptops, telephones, tablets, headphones, and watches." Wrong. Apple makes desktop computers, laptops, handheld computers that oh, also have a telephone app (which apple is fighting tooth and nail to make obsolete btw) among other thousands of applications, slightly bigger tablet sized handheld computers that have thousands of apps, headphones (that have absurd margins, btw) that you plug into those iPhones and iPads, and computers that you wear on your wrist, that oh, like nearly every other device they make, can also tell you what time it is. You really think the iPhone is a... phone? Or that the Apple Watch is a watch? Man, I need to get on the other side of your trades.

They are an innovation, marketing and silicon company, that also creates software to make their universe more sticky to consumers. And thank god for the last 15 years in my portfolio, AAPL doesn't "burn" money. They strategically deploy it very carefully. Which is why outside of the incredibly high margin Beats headphones (which helped them with tech for the also incredibly high margin EarPods), which was as much an acquisition of personnel, patents and engineering as anything, and only cost $3B anyway, and Intel's modem biz (just $1B) which was another patent and engineering grab, Apple doesn't throw around or "burn" money to overpay for someone else's tech. They focus on R&D and while they make small acquisitions often in order to make their products better, they've always resisted the urge to make large purchases on companies with many parts that might not suit them. So no brah... no Toshiba or TVs lol.

The innovation will be in software and content. VR, interactive, content you can stream across all devices... not being bogged down with your Toshiba Apple vacuum cleaner idea lol. I've made plenty of bets in the space, too.

But hey, its funny to watch "really smart guys" act like they know something, underestimate the room and stick their foot in it. Good night.
 
Last edited:

OriginalCanesCanesCanes

All-ACC (#1 most reproted porster on CIS)
Joined
Feb 7, 2013
Messages
23,609
Yes, thank goodness I or other "really smart guys" weren't around to try to talk Steve Jobs out of sticking a streaming stick inside of a TV. Or from buying... Toshiba. :ibis-roflmao-sm3: Oh my, where would the world be today if I had tackled Steve Jobs on the way into that "merger meeting":zczkqmritjdsoaq.jpg:with TOSHIBA (that never happened)??? Do you even know anything about them and their problems? Toshiba, lol. You went there. If you did, you'd be laughing at yourself the way I am laughing at you. Anyway, we'd never have had... oh wait, Apple decided not to make TV's. Ever. They've even got back and forth on monitors for desktops. Barely interested. For all the reasons I stated and more. Because duh. But please, more incredibly innovative ideas. Keep them coming.

It's also adorable that you think Apple makes "desktop computers, laptops, telephones, tablets, headphones, and watches." Wrong. Apple makes desktop computers, laptops, handheld computers that oh, also have a telephone app (which apple is fighting tooth and nail to make obsolete btw) among other thousands of applications, slightly bigger tablet sized handheld computers that have thousands of apps, headphones (that have absurd margins, btw) that you plug into those iPhones and iPads, and computers that you wear on your wrist, that oh, like nearly every other device they make, can also tell you what time it is. You really think the iPhone is a... phone? Or that the Apple Watch is a watch? Man, I need to get on the other side of your trades.

They are an innovation, marketing and silicon company, that also creates software to make their universe more sticky to consumers. And thank god for the last 15 years in my portfolio, AAPL doesn't "burn" money. They strategically deploy it very carefully. Which is why outside of the incredibly high margin Beats headphones (which helped them with tech for the also incredibly high margin EarPods), which was as much an acquisition of personnel, patents and engineering as anything, and only cost $3B anyway, and Intel's modem biz (just $1B) which was another patent and engineering grab, Apple doesn't throw around or "burn" money to overpay for someone else's tech. They focus on R&D and while they make small acquisitions often in order to make their products better, they've always resisted the urge to make large purchases on companies with many parts that might not suit them. So no brah... no Toshiba or TVs lol.

The innovation will be in software and content. VR, interactive, content you can stream across all devices... not being bogged down with your Toshiba Apple vacuum cleaner idea lol. I've made plenty of bets in the space, too.

But hey, its funny to watch "really smart guys" act like they know something, underestimate the room and stick their foot in it. Good night.

You're not as smart as you think you are.

Your arrogance and condescension are only exceeded by you lack of awareness of your own intellect. And also exhibit a lack of good faith in wanting to have a reasonable discussion.

Repetition of rote first paragraph phrases commonly summarized by junior Apple analyst assistants at any firm, do not an erudite observer make.
 
Top