"A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots."

Earnest T. Bass

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Courtesy: Ghosts of the Orange Bowl

Who is the greatest assistant coach in University of Miami history? Names like Walt Kichefski, Joe Brodsky, Don Soldinger, Art Kehoe, Gary Stevens, and Sonny Lubick were among some of the most respected at their craft. But none of them developed more All Americans or future NFL players than Harold Allen. Long before Miami was Quarterback U, Harold Allen made it D-Line U. From 1964 to 1983, he coached defensive linemen for the Canes. His consistency, longevity, and level of excellence during the good times and bad were unmatched.

A native of Florence, South Carolina, Allen first made his mark as a player at UM from 1949 to 1951. Due to injuries, he never played in the NFL. Instead, he found his true calling as a coach. Allen's coaching journey started at Key West High School, where he was the school's head coach from 1957 to 1963. Among his former players were brothers George and Joe Mira and Bill Trout, who all went on to play for the Canes. Another player, John "Boog" Powell, went on to a long baseball career as a first baseman with the Baltimore Orioles. In his final season, Allen led Key West to an upset victory over state champion Coral Gables, handing the Cavaliers their only loss.

When Andy Gustafson retired as UM head coach after the 1963 season, new head coach Charlie Tate immediately brought Allen to his staff. For the next two decades, 7 different head coaches would come and go. But the one constant was Harold Allen. Even during the program's darkest years of the 1970s, Allen was the program's shining light. Among his pupils included Ted Hendricks, Rubin Carter, Tony Cristiani, Don Latimer, Eddie Edwards, Gary Dunn, Don Smith, Jim Burt, and Lester Williams. All of them were either All Americans or NFL 1st round draft picks. Allen would finish his coaching career with a national championship ring in 1983, coaching a young freshman from Brooksville, FL named Jerome Brown. He retired shortly after Howard Schnellenberger decided to leave UM for a USFL job that never materialized. When new head coach Jimmy Johnson was hired in 1984, he was forced to retain all of Schnellenberger's assistants. However, there was one vacancy. The man Johnson chose as Harold Allen's replacement would be Butch Davis. D-Line U was in good hands.
 

sigmar

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Nov 17, 2011
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And there are many others he coached. The one always forgotten is Tony Cline, for you younger guys, he was the father of the tight end Tony Cline. Cline, who recently passed, was the other end with Hendricks and IMO could have been an AA but was over shadowed by his teammate. Played eight years in the NFL, six with Oakland and two with SF. If sacks was an official stat back in his rookie year he would be the all-time leading rookie sack leader with 17 1/2.
I believe they were the best DE combo at Miami of all time.
 

GOCANES05

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The most forgotten HC at the U is Jack Harding maybe because it was so far back and most people from that time are all dead , but anyway just something to look up since were on this subject.

GOCANES
 

KWConch

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Courtesy: Ghosts of the Orange Bowl

Who is the greatest assistant coach in University of Miami history? Names like Walt Kichefski, Joe Brodsky, Don Soldinger, Art Kehoe, Gary Stevens, and Sonny Lubick were among some of the most respected at their craft. But none of them developed more All Americans or future NFL players than Harold Allen. Long before Miami was Quarterback U, Harold Allen made it D-Line U. From 1964 to 1983, he coached defensive linemen for the Canes. His consistency, longevity, and level of excellence during the good times and bad were unmatched.

A native of Florence, South Carolina, Allen first made his mark as a player at UM from 1949 to 1951. Due to injuries, he never played in the NFL. Instead, he found his true calling as a coach. Allen's coaching journey started at Key West High School, where he was the school's head coach from 1957 to 1963. Among his former players were brothers George and Joe Mira and Bill Trout, who all went on to play for the Canes. Another player, John "Boog" Powell, went on to a long baseball career as a first baseman with the Baltimore Orioles. In his final season, Allen led Key West to an upset victory over state champion Coral Gables, handing the Cavaliers their only loss.

When Andy Gustafson retired as UM head coach after the 1963 season, new head coach Charlie Tate immediately brought Allen to his staff. For the next two decades, 7 different head coaches would come and go. But the one constant was Harold Allen. Even during the program's darkest years of the 1970s, Allen was the program's shining light. Among his pupils included Ted Hendricks, Rubin Carter, Tony Cristiani, Don Latimer, Eddie Edwards, Gary Dunn, Don Smith, Jim Burt, and Lester Williams. All of them were either All Americans or NFL 1st round draft picks. Allen would finish his coaching career with a national championship ring in 1983, coaching a young freshman from Brooksville, FL named Jerome Brown. He retired shortly after Howard Schnellenberger decided to leave UM for a USFL job that never materialized. When new head coach Jimmy Johnson was hired in 1984, he was forced to retain all of Schnellenberger's assistants. However, there was one vacancy. The man Johnson chose as Harold Allen's replacement would be Butch Davis. D-Line U was in good hands.
Thanks for the read Earnie.Knew coach Allen well....knew his daughter better...lived across the street from him while he was at KWHS....If we could find more coaches like him we wouldn’t be worried about any of the positions.
 
Last edited:

miamicanephins

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1,372
Courtesy: Ghosts of the Orange Bowl

Who is the greatest assistant coach in University of Miami history? Names like Walt Kichefski, Joe Brodsky, Don Soldinger, Art Kehoe, Gary Stevens, and Sonny Lubick were among some of the most respected at their craft. But none of them developed more All Americans or future NFL players than Harold Allen. Long before Miami was Quarterback U, Harold Allen made it D-Line U. From 1964 to 1983, he coached defensive linemen for the Canes. His consistency, longevity, and level of excellence during the good times and bad were unmatched.

A native of Florence, South Carolina, Allen first made his mark as a player at UM from 1949 to 1951. Due to injuries, he never played in the NFL. Instead, he found his true calling as a coach. Allen's coaching journey started at Key West High School, where he was the school's head coach from 1957 to 1963. Among his former players were brothers George and Joe Mira and Bill Trout, who all went on to play for the Canes. Another player, John "Boog" Powell, went on to a long baseball career as a first baseman with the Baltimore Orioles. In his final season, Allen led Key West to an upset victory over state champion Coral Gables, handing the Cavaliers their only loss.

When Andy Gustafson retired as UM head coach after the 1963 season, new head coach Charlie Tate immediately brought Allen to his staff. For the next two decades, 7 different head coaches would come and go. But the one constant was Harold Allen. Even during the program's darkest years of the 1970s, Allen was the program's shining light. Among his pupils included Ted Hendricks, Rubin Carter, Tony Cristiani, Don Latimer, Eddie Edwards, Gary Dunn, Don Smith, Jim Burt, and Lester Williams. All of them were either All Americans or NFL 1st round draft picks. Allen would finish his coaching career with a national championship ring in 1983, coaching a young freshman from Brooksville, FL named Jerome Brown. He retired shortly after Howard Schnellenberger decided to leave UM for a USFL job that never materialized. When new head coach Jimmy Johnson was hired in 1984, he was forced to retain all of Schnellenberger's assistants. However, there was one vacancy. The man Johnson chose as Harold Allen's replacement would be Butch Davis. D-Line U was in good hands.
Earnie is that really you?
 

No_Fly_Zone

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Gatorhater

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Good write up. Hard to argue against Allen. I think one year four of his linemen played in the NFL. Ted is GOAT in my mind with all due respect to Ray, Ed and ST. If I remember, Burt block a last second two point conversion by noles to ruin about a season that might have given them a shot at title before we got ours. The original heartbreaker for the feather people. Allen was great.
 

djnellz

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Courtesy: Ghosts of the Orange Bowl

Who is the greatest assistant coach in University of Miami history? Names like Walt Kichefski, Joe Brodsky, Don Soldinger, Art Kehoe, Gary Stevens, and Sonny Lubick were among some of the most respected at their craft. But none of them developed more All Americans or future NFL players than Harold Allen. Long before Miami was Quarterback U, Harold Allen made it D-Line U. From 1964 to 1983, he coached defensive linemen for the Canes. His consistency, longevity, and level of excellence during the good times and bad were unmatched.

A native of Florence, South Carolina, Allen first made his mark as a player at UM from 1949 to 1951. Due to injuries, he never played in the NFL. Instead, he found his true calling as a coach. Allen's coaching journey started at Key West High School, where he was the school's head coach from 1957 to 1963. Among his former players were brothers George and Joe Mira and Bill Trout, who all went on to play for the Canes. Another player, John "Boog" Powell, went on to a long baseball career as a first baseman with the Baltimore Orioles. In his final season, Allen led Key West to an upset victory over state champion Coral Gables, handing the Cavaliers their only loss.

When Andy Gustafson retired as UM head coach after the 1963 season, new head coach Charlie Tate immediately brought Allen to his staff. For the next two decades, 7 different head coaches would come and go. But the one constant was Harold Allen. Even during the program's darkest years of the 1970s, Allen was the program's shining light. Among his pupils included Ted Hendricks, Rubin Carter, Tony Cristiani, Don Latimer, Eddie Edwards, Gary Dunn, Don Smith, Jim Burt, and Lester Williams. All of them were either All Americans or NFL 1st round draft picks. Allen would finish his coaching career with a national championship ring in 1983, coaching a young freshman from Brooksville, FL named Jerome Brown. He retired shortly after Howard Schnellenberger decided to leave UM for a USFL job that never materialized. When new head coach Jimmy Johnson was hired in 1984, he was forced to retain all of Schnellenberger's assistants. However, there was one vacancy. The man Johnson chose as Harold Allen's replacement would be Butch Davis. D-Line U was in good hands.

Wow. Great read, @Earnest T. Bass enjoyed it.
 

JTKoval

Cane for Life
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Nov 14, 2017
Messages
209
I will go with Manny. Nice story. But I only accept primary source material.
 

Earnest T. Bass

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Messages
1,840
Thanks for the read Earnie.Knew coach Allen well....knew his daughter better...lived across the street from him while he was at KWHS....If we could find more coaches like him we wouldn’t be worried about any of the positions.
You're welcome, KWConch. Even during the lean years (1950's thru most of the 1970's) the Canes had some great coaches and players, although not enough to make them a national power. I agree 100% with you that more coaches like Coach Allen makes much better teams and positive futures for the kids. By the way; played several high school football games in Key West (1968 & 1970).
 
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