Upon Further Review: Jarrid Williams

Upon Further Review: Jarrid Williams

Lance Roffers
Miami has dipped back into the transfer market and landed the services of an experienced OT in the form of Jarrid Williams from the University of Houston. What sort of player is Miami getting? How much help will he be to the team in the 2020 season? Find out here at Upon Further Review.

As is traditionally my style, I am going to look at Jarrid Williams on a full game (Oklahoma), what he brings in data, and where he might fit overall with the program. Buckle up, things are getting exciting for the ‘Canes.

Most of you already know this, but Jarrid Williams has a bunch of experience playing with our new transfer QB, D’Eriq King, at the University of Houston and helped keep him upright long enough to terrorize college football in 2018.
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On 3rd and long, Oklahoma sends former top-100 recruit Ronnie Perkins off the edge and Williams does a nice job on him initially. He gets a bit over-his-toes and that causes him to lose grip strength late in the rep. Williams got his inside hand into the middle of the defenders’ chest and when that happens you give up the inside to the DE. Get that punch a little wider and this would be a stoning.
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His feet stand out immediately. You’d expect him to have pretty good feet just based on his build and how he carries his weight, but it shows up on film. I’ve seen him pull a few times already and you can see that power is not his forte. He’s more a wall-and-mirror blocker, which is fine if you’re not expecting a people-mover type. If he gets his butt down and engages his hips into his punch he’d have a lot more power. Getting there is the first part though and he does that well. This is against a 1st-round pick in Kenneth Murray and after he had already scraped on that defender trying to get outside to the swing pass.
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Houston really likes to get Williams in space and utilize his athleticism. He’s pulled and scraped and led screens on all but two plays thus far (both third down and long). He truly moves like a 275-pounder and gets to his backside block with ease. Here he is blocking former ESPN-300 recruit, OLB DaShaun White.
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Once is a coincidence, twice has my attention. Again, Williams sets hard outside and places his punch into the middle of the chest of the defender and gives up the inside rip move. This is a pressure on the QB and forces him outside. The defender is former 4-star Jon-Michael Terry. (King picks up 24 on a scramble here)
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Like his feet. Really like his length. His hand placement is below-average at this point in the game. He’s so fluid and mobile he uses this defender stunting and his length to move him several yards out of the play here. Hand placement is a bit off-target, but when you move your guy five yards you won the rep against former ESPN-300 recruit, Jalen Redmond (who tested very well for a DL).
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If I were putting together an instructional video of what “over-your-ski's” looks like for an OT, this play would make the video. Blitzing LB’er gets him way off-balance and Williams punches early. Gotta be more patient with the blitzers are coming in and let them declare where they’re going and react rather than reaching like this.
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The first good thing is he has an extremely elusive QB behind him. The second good thing is he doesn’t give up on the play. Too many times last year I saw our OT get beat initially and then just turn, look back at the QB, slap their hands together and help the QB up. Williams recovers and pushes his defender just wide enough to allow King to escape. Williams has given up two pressures halfway through the 1st quarter.
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This sack and forced fumble is totally on the RG, so I’m not saying it’s on Williams because he has to be wary of the edge defender coming on a blitz. I highlight this to show the continued theme that Williams sets really hard to the outside. His weight is completely on his right leg so hard he isn’t able to redirect and clean this defender up. A more patient approach in his pass sets would help him avoid getting beaten inside. Overset, leads to balance issues. The sack is on the RG, but he could’ve helped more with better footwork and staying patient.
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Initial length allows him to get to this reach block. He even knocks the defender backwards on first contact. A lack of grip strength allows the defender to swat his hands away though and fill the hole for a tackle on this play. Tough ask on a good defender to get that reach block, but you’d like to see him hold it longer after initially making the block.
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This is exactly the same blocking assignment as the play above where the RG gets beaten and Williams gives up the inside split. I do not know the line calls here, so I am not able to state that Williams missed a line call and should have slid down here, or if the RG just missed his block again or not. Williams has to worry about the outside defender first and if he rushes he has to pick him up. Once he drops out into coverage, Williams is responsible for crashing down to help the RG. What I’m seeing is a lack of power and awareness to his inside shoulder. Without knowing the line call I can’t put it on him, but it’s clearly a trend in this game thus far. I do know his RG is not good. King is not used to a LB being able to run him down from this far away (Kenneth Murray).
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Here is Jarrid Williams after the play:
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First play back in they asked him to pull and he was clearly hobbled. Next play, you can see he can’t move at all and is reaching.
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Williams is just asked to wash down the LB at the second level, which leaves the edge defender unblocked. One of the OL missed a line call after an Oklahoma stunt, because you wouldn’t leave TWO defender unblocked on the same side (3-technique and edge both unblocked here). It’s nice to have a QB who makes them both miss and picks up this first down. One being a 1st round pick.
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One of the few times in this game where they’ve asked Williams to do a 45-degree pass set and he shows his length and movement skills. He easily mirrors this DL and pushes him wide.
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Love this play and it’s something Lashlee ran at Auburn (and UConn). C/RG/RT block down and the LG/LT pull to the frontside. RB comes across the face of the QB to hold the backside LB’s. King cuts into this hole with two lead blockers for a huge gain. This type of blocking (reach blocks, down blocks, outside zone blocks) are what Williams will be best at.
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I wrote about the blocks that Williams will be best at, but the pass technique that he will be best at is the 45-degree vertical set. He absorbs the initial punch, adjusts his hands, moves his feet, locks on, and then shuts this pass rush down. These last few 45-degree pass sets he’s shown make me believe he can play LT as long as he gets comfortable with the reverse movements.

This is perfect and is against talent that resembles what he’d see in the ACC (and arguably at the top-end). The better hand placement allows him to maintain grip strength, which was needed on this play to give King time to get to his third read and then check it down to the RB leaking out of the backfield. The RB is able to release because Williams wins his block without help. This goes for a TD.
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I’ve been a bit critical of Williams for giving up the inside a couple of times, but you can see he clearly is able to adjust to late outside blitzers. #44 walked up late and came on the blitz and Williams adjusted perfectly and was all over him.
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Here is a total breakdown of his technique in the same 45-degree vertical sets that he’s performed well thus far. Look at his right leg, he is off-balance again and is lunging and reaching. That foot is turned his QB instead of the sideline and being on-balance and smooth in his kick-slide. This is total chase mode and allows the defender to get his chest with a long-arm as well. When you’re off-balance and leaning forward, not only do you lose power and balance, but you expose your chest. Pressure #3 that I assign to Williams today. His length gives him recovery ability that we do not currently have at T and that’s a big deal. If this were against Zion, this is a sack or tipped pass and this screen to #5 goes for big yardage. Nice when you can get the job done even while having poor technique simply due to physical tools and composure.
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We should never ask him to cut block apparently. He flopped like a dead cockroach here.
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If you read my articles you know that I’m tough on OL and it often sounds like I dislike players that I actually hold in very high regard. It’s just that OL is such a mashup of different skills; it’s a highly technical position that requires intelligence, communication, physical toughness, and also a high level of effort. Since I don’t really do gifs, I don’t have a lot of video to show of what I’m referring to here, but this is at least the sixth time Williams has pulled or otherwise been on the move and not touched a soul. He never even touches a player on this snap. I need to see more effort and physical desire to destroy another man on the football field. Take that critique for what you will, since it’s more opinion on how I want my OL to play. Houston as a whole played a very finesse game in this one and left King exposed and running for his life far too often.
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Whiffs again at the second-level. You’d think he’d be great at second-level blocking due to his mobility, but he tends to come in off-balance and whiff on the LB’s. His man makes the tackle.
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Important to keep in mind he was banged up in this game and had moments where he was clearly hobbled. He’s beaten cleanly to the inside again here. He tried to jump set on the outside rush and exposed the inside shoulder and was beaten cleanly. Pressure #4 and it’s now a thing on inside counter moves.
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A shield-and-wall blocker in the run game. If you understand that and ask him to do things he’s good at, that isn’t a problem. If you ask him to run power all game, you’re probably going to be disappointed. This is an effective block on the backside counter give where the RB is cutting to LT, but the way he’s blocking here has no leg or hip drive.
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This is how Williams got into the above position, by getting off-balance when his initial punch didn’t land. He’s good at continuing to battle and keeping himself alive in a play though.
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Leaning and off-balance again. Feet are wide and facing toward the QB again. As you see it, it opens up your chest and robs your power. His length is what saves him here. Doesn’t have to be pretty, just get the job done, but there are things to work on.
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Way too passive here. He gave a strong initial push and moved the defender, but then he stopped. Why did he stop and stand up here? Keep working! If he keeps bending at his knees and driving this defender down the line this is a walk-in TD.
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I really wish he liked to hit people more. Once again, not touching a soul.
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If I’m Rhett Lashlee, I’m never asking Williams to pull or try to get to LB’s at the second-level. He just doesn’t have the instincts for it. He never touches anyone on this play and he’s the lead blocker on a pull.
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By the Numbers:

  • Jarrid Williams played in only four games last season, which enabled him to keep his redshirt season. For that reason, I am using the data for his 2018 season, in which PFF tracked him playing 952 total snaps. Of which, 502 were dropbacks. That is a total pressure percentage of 2.6%, though Temple was the most difficult opponent he faced.

  • Zion Nelson played 511 passing snaps and allowed 12 sacks, 4 hits, 22 hurries for 38 total pressures. That is a pressure percentage of 7.4% and was one of the worst among P5 players. PFF weights sacks at twice the amount as hits or hurries, which is why his pass blocking efficiency was only 95.1. Only nine players were worse from an efficiency standpoint and none were worse as far as sacks go.

  • DJ Scaife played 521 passing snaps and allowed 3 sacks, 2 hits, 18 hurries for 23 total pressures. That is a pressure percentage of 4.4% and a pass blocking efficiency of 97.5. This ranked 68th out of 149, or slightly above average in P5.

  • Navaughn Donaldson played 396 passing snaps and allowed 3 sacks, 3 hits, 6 hurries for 12 total pressures. This is a pressure percentage of 3.3% and a pass blocking efficiency of 98.1. This ranked 70th out of 160 P5 guards, or slightly above average.

  • John Campbell played 172 pass snaps and allowed 0 sacks or hits, but allowed 16 hurries. This is a pressure percentage of 9.3% and a pass blocking efficiency of 95.3. Only one P5 guard was worse, but Campbell did play some tackle (including a start), so not all snaps were played at that spot. 159th out of 160 P5 guards. Getting competition for this spot is one of the biggest reasons I’m excited about adding Jarrid Williams.

  • Corey Gaynor played 525 passing snaps and allowed 4 sacks, 5 hits, 11 pressures for 20 total pressures and a pressure percentage of 3.8%. His pass blocking efficiency ranked 53rd out of 72 P5 centers, or well below-average.
Overall

The type of talent Williams faced against Oklahoma will be representative of the talent he sees in the ACC, and in some cases much better. Kenneth Murray was brilliant in this game with his speed and ability to shut down King’s escape plan.

Positives
  • Length- At 6-7, Williams has the length to push defenders wide and to recover when he gets off-balance. This is the reason you see coaches clamor for length in their OT’s because it increases their margin for error.
  • Feet- He has the type of feet that allow him to glide into his 45-degree sets. He doesn’t have “Joe Thomas Vertical Set no matter what” feet, but they are above-average.
  • Experience- This is a 6th year senior who has played against some quality programs in his career. In my opinion, every position group needs someone experienced who can relay to the rest of the players in his group how it should be. It helps to hold individuals accountable as well. Like King in the QB room, Williams will bring necessary age.
  • Play through nicks- It's a great sign when a player wants it badly enough to play through nicks and injuries. The injury he sustained in this game continued to linger for the rest of his season. He didn't miss a play in this game (injury occurred on 3rd down and he came back with next series).
Opportunities
  • Balance- Williams is off-balance far more than I would like to see. To his credit, he recovers more often than not.
  • Second Level Blocking- He was astoundingly poor in this game at blocking at the second level. Lack of patience, lack of balance, and poor timing in his punch were all factors as to why.
  • Inside Shoulder- Whether it is communication, balance in over setting, or lack of confidence that he can handle speed outside, Williams was consistently beaten inside in this game. For an OT, you have to work inside-out as the quickest path to your QB is inside rather than around the arc.
  • Run Blocking- He’s strictly a positional run blocker and not a people mover due to an inability to engage his hips when he drives blocks.
What I would Do:
Jarrid Williams is going to be a 6th-year Senior for a reason. He’s got some talent, but not the kind of talent that demands forgoing any eligibility to enter into the NFL draft. I’ve outlined all the good and bad that I see on film with him and I would move him to LT. The LT is asked to get to the second-level or pull far less often than the RT is- especially if Lashlee runs the offense he ran at Auburn. Williams is good at 45-degree pass sets and can recover around the edge. Additionally, the inside shoulder of the LT is protected by the LG far more often than the inside shoulder of the RT is.

When I watch Williams, I see him finding a role on this team as a starter. Most of us do not expect an All-American grad transfer in his sixth season. What I do believe Williams does is lessen the importance that one of the young tackles is ready to start right away. It also all but removes the scenario of needing to start both Zion Nelson and John Campbell at the T positions if they move Scaife inside.

The most likely outcome for Williams is that he turns into an average or slightly below-average OT in the ACC and that is massive upgrade over what we had last year.

An OL of Williams/Donaldson/Gaynor/Jakai Clark/Scaife is probably our best line and gives us a chance to be an average ACC unit for the first time in several years.
 

Comments (101)

doesn’t give up on the play. Too many times last year I saw our OT get beat initially and then just turn, look back at the QB, slap their hands together and help the QB up. Williams recovers and pushes his defender just wide enough to allow King to escape. Williams has given up two pressures
 
Good article. Very thorough. I am excited about Williams joining out OL. Williams add a lot of talent and experience to the Canes OL, which was sorely lacking last season. I saw Clark and Nelson get overwhelmed too much from a lack of talent and strength perspective last season. Don’t count out Rivers, Walker or one of the more talented OL being a factor.
 
Well even after that not too stellar review, I’m still really pumped about adding Jarrid and I think our offense is going to eat this season.

Hopefully Garin can help iron out some of his deficiencies.
 
Well even after that not too stellar review, I’m still really pumped about adding Jarrid and I think our offense is going to eat this season.

Hopefully Garin can help iron out some of his deficiencies.
You should definitely be excited about adding him. An average P5 OT is a massive upgrade to what we had last year.

Sometimes we hear the word “average” and it’s seen negatively, but that’s honestly a good player. Scaife was grades slightly above-average last year and I don’t think anyone would disagree that he was clearly our best OL. Adding another player in that realm is a huge addition and it also helps spots below him, because it moves everyone down a spot. Rather than relying on a starter before, now they can be the 3rd OT. Instead of needing to be a 3rd OT, now maybe that player redshirts.

Don’t underestimate having a talented player move down to scout team. Those guys get your starters ready and if your scout team OT’s can’t block your starting DE’s for any time at all, it screws up practice. Can you even imagine how bad our scout team OT’s must’ve been last year?

Depth is a trickledown, and this is the best trickledown we’ve had at OT in years adding Williams and Walker late.
 
So you put williams at LT and campbell at RT?
 
Agreed, put Williams at LT. Love the breakdown, even if the stats are somewhat sobering.
 
I think it’s fairly apparent this kid is going to have to be our starting LT, unless he’s Tommy Kennedy 2.0, which clearly is not possible via the tape against good competition. I just don’t see how any other scenario unfolds, unless one of the young tackles develops into an all-ACC type player in one off-season, which I just can’t imagine happening.

So a line with Williams and Scaife as the bookends with Gaynor and the other 2 best on the interior has some promise. Nobody expects the 2018 OU line. But it really *should* be the best line we’ve had in the last few years.
 
No. I put Scaife at RT and Campbell on the bench.
This is what I think. But why oh why was Scaife playing G in spring?? We did the same thing to him last season, gave him no reps at tackle all spring/offseason and then kicked him out wide out of necessity mid-stream. Wtf are we thinking w/ Zion and Campbell and Herbert battling to be our starters at tackle?
 
You should definitely be excited about adding him. An average P5 OT is a massive upgrade to what we had last year.

Sometimes we hear the word “average” and it’s seen negatively, but that’s honestly a good player. Scaife was grades slightly above-average last year and I don’t think anyone would disagree that he was clearly our best OL. Adding another player in that realm is a huge addition and it also helps spots below him, because it moves everyone down a spot. Rather than relying on a starter before, now they can be the 3rd OT. Instead of needing to be a 3rd OT, now maybe that player redshirts.

Don’t underestimate having a talented player move down to scout team. Those guys get your starters ready and if your scout team OT’s can’t block your starting DE’s for any time at all, it screws up practice. Can you even imagine how bad our scout team OT’s must’ve been last year?

Depth is a trickledown, and this is the best trickledown we’ve had at OT in years adding Williams and Walker late.
I think an important consideration for how far an average OL can take you is the QB. You can win with an average OL and exceptional QB.
 
There were 9 offensive tackles worse than Zion Nelson? Who are those guys jeez. I don’t fault Zion too much - came in worked his ass off to get bigger and the team didn’t put him in a position to succeed whatsoever. That being said, I cant fathom an offensive lineman having a worse season than him.
 
There were 9 offensive tackles worse than Zion Nelson? Who are those guys jeez. I don’t fault Zion too much - came in worked his ass off to get bigger and the team didn’t put him in a position to succeed whatsoever. That being said, I cant fathom an offensive lineman having a worse season than him.
Well, 2 of'em played at FSU. Not sure abour the other 7..
 
Nice breakdown Lance.

From 247Sports, the projected 2-deep for the OL is:

Left Tackle: Jarrid Williams, Issiah Walker or Kai-Leon Herbert

Left Guard: DJ Scaife, Jalen Rivers

Center: Corey Gaynor, Jakai Clark

Right Guard: Navaughn Donaldson, Cleveland Reed

Right Tackle: John Campbell, Zion Nelson or Kai-Leon Herbert

The best scenario for the future is that Nelson, Walker, and Rivers all redshirt. If they do, then that means our offensive line is holding it down. No pun intended.
 
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2021 Commits

OG
6'2"
295
Miami, FL
DT
6'4"
290
Miami, FL
WR
6'2"
180
Miami, FL
RB
6'0"
225
Hollywood, FL
TE
6'4"
210
Frisco, TX
S
5'11"
190
Miami, FL
WR
5'11"
160
Fort Lauderdale, FL
OT
6'7"
255
Pompano Beach, FL
CB
5'10"
145
Miami, FL
TE
6'2"
205
Miami, FL

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2020 Schedule

09/05
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Virginia Tech
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Georgia Tech
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11/28
Duke
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