Recruit Notebook - Artie Burns

Recruit Notebook - Artie Burns

Cameron Underwood
Hey guys! Had a lot going on with performances and the end of school for the break, and getting sick, but that’s all in the past. I’m back, and ready for more awesome recruiting action!!

Today’s installment of the Recruit Notebook, we look at a player who has long been committed to The U: Miami Northwestern Defensive Back Artie Burns.

Part 1: Artie Burns, the player
Burns is a top athlete who uses his physical gifts with great success. Burns will figure to be a positive contributor in a number of areas at the collegiate level.

Measurables
Burns has good height at legit 6’1”. Burns is a bit thin, and could, like almost ever HS recruit on the planet, stand to add 10-15lbs of muscle. Burns has a good frame, and is well built for an outside skill player.

Burns’ best asset is his top notch speed. Burns was timed at 4.5 in the 40, but he plays MUCH faster than that. A noted track athlete, Burns is a bit of a long strider with speed that can affect games in all 3 phases (Offense, Defense, and Special teams) with his speed. This is BY FAR his best attribute, and it can play from day 1 in college.

Tackling/Run Support
Burns is unlike most players I’ve seen in this area. He doesn’t wrap up so much as he tries to play demolition derby. Burns uses his elite acceleration and speed to hit top speed and then run into the ball carrier, bringing them both to the ground. Obviously, some wrapping has to be done to make this effective, but this is not the preferred technique when it comes to tackling.

Burns is a very willing tackler and seems to like contact. He doesn’t love it as much as, say, linebackers and linemen, but he doesn’t run away from a good hit either. If this were my class, and I was giving grades, I’d say Burns’ gets an A for effort, and a C+ for achievement when it comes to tackling.

Blitzing
Burns blitzed more than other DBs I’ve profiled in the past. On a defense with several FBS/Division 1/Good college prospects on it, Burns was let loose on the offense.

Burns was a great blitzer at the High School level for one reason: his speed was too much to handle. At the collegiate level, I think that he will have to be deployed in an effective scheme to be an impact player in this area.

Coverage
And here is the metaphorical fork in the road. Some people strongly believe he is a pure cover Corner. Others believe he is a wonderful prospect at Safety. And those 2 views are, apparently, mutually exclusive.

To my eyes, Burns provides good coverage with average technique. In man to man situations, he can tend to take a false or wasted step, but uses his hands well to direct the receiver and disrupt routes. Also, his speed allows him to make up any ground that a receiver might have gained on him during the play.

In zone situations, Burns seems to take slightly deeper drops than most players, choosing to rely on his speed to make up the additional distance. Burns seems to have a good understanding of what opposing offenses will try to run, especially when it comes to route combinations.

Burns has good ball skills, a testament to his time spent playing on offense. He is not the best ballhawk around, but he’s pretty darn good.

Personally, I side with Deion Sanders (who is coached Burns in a practice session at the Under Armour All-American game) in thinking that Burns is more of a Safety than a Corner. His coverage skills are good, but I don’t think he’s best suited to stay on the outside. Slot coverage or Safety are, to me, the best place for Burns to ply his trade in college.

Overall, Burns doesn’t possess any one singular great coverage skill. In his case, the sum of them all is greater than the individual parts.

Positional Versatility
Burns played all over the place in High School with great success. Corner. Safety. Receiver. Returner. Short of throwing the ball, Burns just about did it all.

As a player with elite speed, Burns has the ability to impact games in a variety of areas. Burns’ coverage ability is the trait that is getting the most attention, as he has been recruited as a defensive back. Burns could challenge to play early in the secondary as a nickel back or reserve Safety.

Burns can see the field early as a returner. He excelled in this area while in high school, using good instincts and superior athleticism to find open space and change field position.

Part 2: Game Evaluation
I know it’s going to sound like I’m a broken record, but the first thing you notice about Artie Burns on the field is his speed. Burns, like other players I’ve profiled, plays to his 40 time (or faster in this case), and that helps him impact the game in the many areas I’ve already listed.

As I said before, Burns impacts the game on Special Teams. He was Northwestern’s primary kickoff returner for the last 2 years, and he performed very well in this role. The thing about his returning that I like is the fact that Burns isn’t a dancer like Devin Hester or Roscoe Parrish were. Burns likes to find a hole, hit it quick, then use his speed to find the sideline and score.

As a defensive back, Burns was often used to match up with the opposition’s best receiver. Playing in arguably the toughest district in the State, if not the Country, this was no small task. Burns’ coverage was a key to the success of the Northwestern defense, and he took great pains to ensure that his receiver didn’t contribute much on offense.

While Burns doesn’t take great pursuit angles due to the fact that he’s rarely in a recovery position, he excels in tracking down players who may have gotten past him. Burns shows good effort on the field, and could be seen chasing down players on the complete other side of the field from where he started a play. He takes great pride to do anything he can to keep the opposition out of the endzone.

Burns was rotated into the offense a decent amount of the time (about 50% of snaps in the game I saw this year), and was frequently targeted when on the field. I heard a stat that he averaged almost 20 yards per touch on offense, which sounds about right for a player with his speed and skills. He won’t be used on offense in college, but I was pleased with what I saw from him in this area.

Burns doesn’t demonstrate emotion on the field often, but when he does, it serves as a poignant punctuation to what was, invariably, a key play for the Bulls. I like his demeanor, confident but not cocky. Burns, like others, prefers to let his play do the talking for him. But, like most Miami players, he can be known to “turn up” from time to time.

Part 3: College Projection
No matter the arena, I tend to take the word of professionals who know their craft. That being said, I will have to agree with Deion Sanders in thinking that Burns is better suited for Safety as opposed to Cornerback.

Burns does have above average coverage skills, a great frame, and elite speed. All of these traits will play well at either spot in the secondary, but I think that his skill set is more aptly suited towards Safety.

Burns is a bit thin, like most high school players. He will have the ability to add good size (5-10lbs) before his Freshman season, and that might be enough to allow him to see the field early at Miami. To me, Burns still looks like a track athlete playing football. At this time next year, I expect him to be a Football Player running Track. That distinction is small, but the details make the difference at this level.

With the composition of the Miami Roster, I don’t foresee Burns taking a redshirt year next year. Losing Thomas Finnie along with Vaughn Telemaque and Brandon McGee create a thin depth chart that will be bolstered by the addition of Artie Burns. Whether he will play Corner or Safety remains to be seen, but he will help fill a need for depth and skill at either position.

A player who Burns compares to is San Francisco CB and former Penn State CB Justin King. King was a highly touted recruit, whose speed was far more advanced than his coverage skills coming out of High School. Now, I know you’re going to say “King ended up starting as a Freshman”, and you’re right. While I do not think Burns will end up starting next year in Miami , I think he could eventually be a very good player for the Hurricanes.

Final Grades
Athleticism – A
Football IQ – B
Tackling/Run Support – C-
Coverage skills – B
Fundamentals and Technique – B+
Leadership/Maturity – B
Physical development – C+
Versatility – B+
Potential – B+

Overall Recruit Grade – B+
Burns is another in the long line of top Division 1 prospects to come out of Miami Northwestern. The list of top prospects to come out of this program is long and distinguished. Burns matched up with Alabama star WR Amari Cooper in practice for 2 years, and those battles helped to hone and refine his skills.

Artie Burns, like most kids from South Florida, grew up wanting to put on the Orange and Green and be a Miami Hurricane. Burns’ dream is set to become reality on February 6th.

Not a day too soon if you’re a Hurricane fan.
 

Comments (50)

Hey guys! Had a lot going on with performances and the end of school for the break, and getting sick, but that’s all in the past. I’m back, and ready for more awesome recruiting action!!

Today’s installment of the Recruit Notebook, we look at a player who has long been committed to The U: Miami Northwestern Defensive Back Artie Burns.

Part 1: Artie Burns, the player
Burns is a top athlete who uses his physical gifts with great success. Burns will figure to be a positive contributor in a number of areas at the collegiate level.

Measurables
Burns has good height at legit 6’1”. Burns is a bit thin, and could, like almost ever HS recruit on the planet, stand to add 10-15lbs of muscle. Burns has a good frame, and is well built for an outside skill player.

Burns’ best asset is his top notch speed. Burns was timed at 4.5 in the 40, but he plays MUCH faster than that. A noted track athlete, Burns is a bit of a long strider with speed that can affect games in all 3 phases (Offense, Defense, and Special teams) with his speed. This is BY FAR his best attribute, and it can play from day 1 in college.

Tackling/Run Support
Burns is unlike most players I’ve seen in this area. He doesn’t wrap up so much as he tries to play demolition derby. Burns uses his elite acceleration and speed to hit top speed and then run into the ball carrier, bringing them both to the ground. Obviously, some wrapping has to be done to make this effective, but this is not the preferred technique when it comes to tackling.

Burns is a very willing tackler and seems to like contact. He doesn’t love it as much as, say, linebackers and linemen, but he doesn’t run away from a good hit either. If this were my class, and I was giving grades, I’d say Burns’ gets an A for effort, and a C+ for achievement when it comes to tackling.

Blitzing
Burns blitzed more than other DBs I’ve profiled in the past. On a defense with several FBS/Division 1/Good college prospects on it, Burns was let loose on the offense.

Burns was a great blitzer at the High School level for one reason: his speed was too much to handle. At the collegiate level, I think that he will have to be deployed in an effective scheme to be an impact player in this area.

Coverage
And here is the metaphorical fork in the road. Some people strongly believe he is a pure cover Corner. Others believe he is a wonderful prospect at Safety. And those 2 views are, apparently, mutually exclusive.

To my eyes, Burns provides good coverage with average technique. In man to man situations, he can tend to take a false or wasted step, but uses his hands well to direct the receiver and disrupt routes. Also, his speed allows him to make up any ground that a receiver might have gained on him during the play.

In zone situations, Burns seems to take slightly deeper drops than most players, choosing to rely on his speed to make up the additional distance. Burns seems to have a good understanding of what opposing offenses will try to run, especially when it comes to route combinations.

Burns has good ball skills, a testament to his time spent playing on offense. He is not the best ballhawk around, but he’s pretty darn good.

Personally, I side with Deion Sanders (who is coached Burns in a practice session at the Under Armour All-American game) in thinking that Burns is more of a Safety than a Corner. His coverage skills are good, but I don’t think he’s best suited to stay on the outside. Slot coverage or Safety are, to me, the best place for Burns to ply his trade in college.

Overall, Burns doesn’t possess any one singular great coverage skill. In his case, the sum of them all is greater than the individual parts.

Positional Versatility
Burns played all over the place in High School with great success. Corner. Safety. Receiver. Returner. Short of throwing the ball, Burns just about did it all.

As a player with elite speed, Burns has the ability to impact games in a variety of areas. Burns’ coverage ability is the trait that is getting the most attention, as he has been recruited as a defensive back. Burns could challenge to play early in the secondary as a nickel back or reserve Safety.

Burns can see the field early as a returner. He excelled in this area while in high school, using good instincts and superior athleticism to find open space and change field position.

Part 2: Game Evaluation
I know it’s going to sound like I’m a broken record, but the first thing you notice about Artie Burns on the field is his speed. Burns, like other players I’ve profiled, plays to his 40 time (or faster in this case), and that helps him impact the game in the many areas I’ve already listed.

As I said before, Burns impacts the game on Special Teams. He was Northwestern’s primary kickoff returner for the last 2 years, and he performed very well in this role. The thing about his returning that I like is the fact that Burns isn’t a dancer like Devin Hester or Roscoe Parrish were. Burns likes to find a hole, hit it quick, then use his speed to find the sideline and score.

As a defensive back, Burns was often used to match up with the opposition’s best receiver. Playing in arguably the toughest district in the State, if not the Country, this was no small task. Burns’ coverage was a key to the success of the Northwestern defense, and he took great pains to ensure that his receiver didn’t contribute much on offense.

While Burns doesn’t take great pursuit angles due to the fact that he’s rarely in a recovery position, he excels in tracking down players who may have gotten past him. Burns shows good effort on the field, and could be seen chasing down players on the complete other side of the field from where he started a play. He takes great pride to do anything he can to keep the opposition out of the endzone.

Burns was rotated into the offense a decent amount of the time (about 50% of snaps in the game I saw this year), and was frequently targeted when on the field. I heard a stat that he averaged almost 20 yards per touch on offense, which sounds about right for a player with his speed and skills. He won’t be used on offense in college, but I was pleased with what I saw from him in this area.

Burns doesn’t demonstrate emotion on the field often, but when he does, it serves as a poignant punctuation to what was, invariably, a key play for the Bulls. I like his demeanor, confident but not ****y. Burns, like others, prefers to let his play do the talking for him. But, like most Miami players, he can be known to “turn up” from time to time.

Part 3: College Projection
No matter the arena, I tend to take the word of professionals who know their craft. That being said, I will have to agree with Deion Sanders in thinking that Burns is better suited for Safety as opposed to Cornerback.

Burns does have above average coverage skills, a great frame, and elite speed. All of these traits will play well at either spot in the secondary, but I think that his skill set is more aptly suited towards Safety.

Burns is a bit thin, like most high school players. He will have the ability to add good size (5-10lbs) before his Freshman season, and that might be enough to allow him to see the field early at Miami. To me, Burns still looks like a track athlete playing football. At this time next year, I expect him to be a Football Player running Track. That distinction is small, but the details make the difference at this level.

With the composition of the Miami Roster, I don’t foresee Burns taking a redshirt year next year. Losing Thomas Finnie along with Vaughn Telemaque and Brandon McGee create a thin depth chart that will be bolstered by the addition of Artie Burns. Whether he will play Corner or Safety remains to be seen, but he will help fill a need for depth and skill at either position.

A player who Burns compares to is San Francisco CB and former Penn State CB Justin King. King was a highly touted recruit, whose speed was far more advanced than his coverage skills coming out of High School. Now, I know you’re going to say “King ended up starting as a Freshman”, and you’re right. While I do not think Burns will end up starting next year in Miami , I think he could eventually be a very good player for the Hurricanes.

Final Grades
Athleticism – A
Football IQ – B
Tackling/Run Support – C-
Coverage skills – B
Fundamentals and Technique – B+
Leadership/Maturity – B
Physical development – C+
Versatility – B+
Potential – B+

Overall Recruit Grade – B+
Burns is another in the long line of top Division 1 prospects to come out of Miami Northwestern. The list of top prospects to come out of this program is long and distinguished. Burns matched up with Alabama star WR Amari Cooper in practice for 2 years, and those battles helped to hone and refine his skills.

Artie Burns, like most kids from South Florida, grew up wanting to put on the Orange and Green and be a Miami Hurricane. Burns’ dream is set to become reality on February 6th.

Not a day too soon if you’re a Hurricane fan.
Great write up Cameron...been waiting for this one. I love him at safety especially considering our depth there as opposed to cb. Just feel like he plays more like a safety then a corner and once he gets on campus and in a college weightlifting program he should be set. Are we recruiting him purely at cb or safety or as an athlete?
 
As a player...

Corner skills in a safeties body.

In the pro game, a player of his skill set in today's NFL would be playing inside taking full advantage of his positional versatility, size, and natural football ability while also putting him out on the edge. In college, he could be a nice boundary corner or play safety, both with great efficacy.

I think he'll immediately contribute on special teams and he'll be in the mix getting tons of playing time by the end of his freshman season.

If I put together a little Top X list like ol Petey Pab did of SoFla players, I would have put Artie Burns #2 behind Matthew Thomas. He's got that first round potential.

As a man...

He's cursed. Dark clouds that rain acid follow him. He was baptized in eternal fire and only knows misery. Ain't nobody gotta worry about Big Mamma Burns, in 3 years, she never gonna have to pay rent again.
 
I think Burns is too special of an athlete to put at safety, but interested to see where he plays.
 
Great job as usual Cam. Love Artie's versatility which will allow him to contribute from day 1 whether on D or ST. :stormwarning:
 
I like Olsen and some of the other top recuits we have so far but Artie Burns is my favorite. His attitude, poise etc.

He tried to play the recruiting game a bit but just kicked it and said I am 100% cane because I can now go help recruit for Miami.

oh yeah.. i like that he doesn't smile...one mean cane!
 
Saban wanted him badly and early.

That is all you need to know, really.
 
Great write up Cameron...been waiting for this one. I love him at safety especially considering our depth there as opposed to cb. Just feel like he plays more like a safety then a corner and once he gets on campus and in a college weightlifting program he should be set. Are we recruiting him purely at cb or safety or as an athlete?
Recruiting as a Safety, I believe. We'll work out which position he sticks at when he gets on campus.
 
Corner...I won't be moved
And I'm the exact opposite always thought Safety.

Now I'm not saying no to Corner because Finnie might be gone so he could slide over there as well. I just like him as a Safety more.
 
Favorite commit. He's an A++ athlete, and the type we have been missing in the secondary for years. SEC corner.
 
The main reason I want him at corner first is because I think we're pretty solid at saftey(Highsmith,Bush,Jenkins, Rodgers). Carter is also coming in as a safety, so we should try Burns out at CB first. If it doesn't work out there then move him to safety.
 
eveyone will get snaps golden is a great coach
 
The main reason I want him at corner first is because I think we're pretty solid at saftey(Highsmith,Bush,Jenkins, Rodgers). Carter is also coming in as a safety, so we should try Burns out at CB first. If it doesn't work out there then move him to safety.
Rodgers is WOAT and him and highsmith will be gone after next year leaving our depth at safety thin. We got more bodies at corner with potential than at safety.
 
The main reason I want him at corner first is because I think we're pretty solid at saftey(Highsmith,Bush,Jenkins, Rodgers). Carter is also coming in as a safety, so we should try Burns out at CB first. If it doesn't work out there then move him to safety.
Rodgers is WOAT and him and highsmith will be gone after next year leaving our depth at safety thin. We got more bodies at corner with potential than at safety.
I agree with you, I'm not saying I wouldn't want him at safety just that after Howard and Gunter we're pretty thin at CB. Yes we have some guys coming off a shirt, but Burns is an elite talent. Let him prove himself at corner if it doesn't work then he'll be a safety no problem. But we'll find out where he'll play when he gets here.
 
The main reason I want him at corner first is because I think we're pretty solid at saftey(Highsmith,Bush,Jenkins, Rodgers). Carter is also coming in as a safety, so we should try Burns out at CB first. If it doesn't work out there then move him to safety.
Rodgers is WOAT and him and highsmith will be gone after next year leaving our depth at safety thin. We got more bodies at corner with potential than at safety.
I agree with you, I'm not saying I wouldn't want him at safety just that after Howard and Gunter we're pretty thin at CB. Yes we have some guys coming off a shirt, but Burns is an elite talent. Let him prove himself at corner if it doesn't work then he'll be a safety no problem. But we'll find out where he'll play when he gets here.
Yeah I'm sure he can play where ever in the secondary and make an impact but I prefer him at safety but you right we will find out once he gets on campus.
 
Outstanding as usual. Really agree with what you said about Burns's demeanor. That, along with his God-given athleticism, will take him a long way.

I'd just really like to see Miami add a big corner. Ladarius Gunter is the only one on the roster. The rest are fiesty but small. Burns is a little stiff but breaks on the ball like he's exploding out the blocks.

One thing is for sure is that he will be a special teams monster. He has the speed and aggression for every coverage unit and he can return. He also blocked multiple kicks in high school.
 

2021 Commits

OG
6'2"
295
Miami, FL
DT
6'4"
290
Miami, FL
RB
6'0"
215
Hollywood, FL
OT
6'7"
255
Pompano Beach, FL
CB
5'10"
145
Miami, FL
TE
6'2"
205
Miami, FL
OLB
6'3"
205
Miami, FL
TE
6'5"
220
Miami, FL
K
5'11"
140
Hollywood, FL
OLB
6'2"
200
Homestead, FL

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11/07
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11/28
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