2021 Recruiting Class Countdown: #20-16

2021 Recruiting Class Countdown: #20-16

Lance Roffers
Miami signed 21 players in the early signing period and it looks to be a really strong class. Everyone loves a list, so I decided to watch a full game of every recruit and then rank them. A few caveats: 1. I’m not ranking the kicker, because frankly, I’m not a kicker expert. Safe to say he’s a great kicking prospect and he probably starts as a freshman. 2. Someone has to populate every spot on the list. Someone has to be last. Someone has to be 17th etc. This is a good recruiting class and some good recruits are going in at these lower rankings. 3. I’ve been wrong before and some of the players ranked at the bottom will prove me wrong and some at the top probably will as well.

Methodology
  • Linear Speed- How fast is the recruit in a straight line compared to other P5 prospects at that same position. Corey Flagg would be a 5 for linear speed at ILB etc.
  • Agility- Ability to change directions compared to other P5 prospects at that same position. DJ Ivey would be a 5 for agility at CB.
  • Frame- Prospects frame compared to other P5 prospects at that same position. Nesta Silvera would be a 5 for frame at DT.
  • Potential- With average development in a P5 program, what is the ultimate potential of a prospect compared to other P5 prospects at that same position. N’Kosi Perry would be a 5 for potential at QB.
The List

20. Deshawn Troutman- ILB, 6-1, 205, Edgewater (Orlando, Florida) #685 overall (3-star)

Linear Speed- 7, Agility- 6, Frame- 5, Potential- 6

Strengths: Can really run in a straight line. Flashes range that is well above-average in coverage. Can turn and run with a receiver down the seam and get to landmarks quickly. Run-and-chase type LB’er. Here he shows range by sifting through traffic and meeting the RB outside to stop a big play.
Troutman.PNG


Opportunities: Lacks weight and struggles to tackle at times. In the picture below, Hankerson shrugs him off for a TD on 3rd down.
Troutman- 1.PNG


Run fits can be a struggle for Troutman, as he tends to go around blocks, rather than stack-and-shed or fill the hole hard. The St. Thomas Aquinas RB is a star, but he was clearly a talent that Troutman struggled with. Two of St. Thomas Aquinas’ TD’s were because the RB ran over Troutman into the end zone.

Here he is pushed completely out of the hole by a TE after he had already overrun his gap. Often times he was playing run defense by backing up and hoping to make a tackle with the angle after a sizeable gain.
Troutman- 2.PNG


Run fits can be a struggle for Troutman, as he tends to go around blocks, rather than stack-and-shed or fill the hole hard. The St. Thomas Aquinas RB is a star, but he was clearly a talent that Troutman struggled with. Two of St. Thomas Aquinas’ TD’s were because the RB ran over Troutman into the end zone.

Here he is pushed completely out of the hole by a TE after he had already overrun his gap. Often times he was playing run defense by backing up and hoping to make a tackle with the angle after a sizeable gain.
Troutman- 3.png


Overall: You can see the appeal in Troutman, as he is an athletic player who brings range and speed. Similar to Avery Huff in that he needs to add weight and is lacking in instincts. Like Huff, he will most likely struggle to make an early impact. The best hope for Troutman to be an impact player is to put him at WLB and ask him to chase plays from the backside.

19. Allan Haye- DT, 6-1, 296, Chaminade-Madonna (Hollywood, Florida) #918 overall (3-star)

Linear Speed- 5, Agility- 6, Frame- 4, Potential- 5

Strengths: Built like a fire hydrant, Haye shows great strength and an ability to anchor. He has a big gut and looks like he’d be a NT-only, but shows legitimate burst, speed, and change-of-direction. Tries to do his assignment and not be the hero, which is a foundational element for your run defense.

Uses his hands well for a high school DT. Already possessing a swim move, ability to swipe the hands of an OL off of him, and the grip strength to keep his lane.
Haye.png


Opportunities: Plays far too high for a DT. Allows himself to be stood up and neutralized due to a lack of length. His path to good rotational play is to utilize leverage and strength to hold point-of-attack in run game and first step quickness in pass game, both of which are maximized by playing lower.
Haye- 1.png


Overall: There are definitely tools to work with here, as Haye plays with a strong motor, is naturally powerful, and will do the dirty work inside. He understands hand usage and has a nice first step. Lack of length, playing too upright, lack of finishing tools in pass rush, and just an average athlete cap his ceiling to that of a rotational player, but as a second DT you could do worse because of his willingness to occupy blockers and let others get the glory. Miami has a lot of glory players and need more ditch-diggers.

18. Khalil Brantley- TE, 6-2, 205, Miami Northwestern (Miami, Florida) #800 (3-star)

Linear Speed- 8, Agility- 6, Frame- 4, Potential- 6

Strengths: Brantley has receiver skills and excellent straight-line speed. For a player built as stockily as he is, he was often running away from Florida HS DB’s. Understands how to attack the MOF and has good hand-eye coordination.

Opportunities: Lacks suddenness to his routes. Often times looked like he has build-up speed, rather than burst to create on his own. Lots of free releases and never really had to play through contact and keep going into his route. Is truly an oversized WR right now and will need to learn how to play in both a detached role and in-line as a TE. Due to lack of length, he might be destined for more of an H-back role than a true TE role.

Overall: Offense at Northwestern didn’t do him many favors as they tended to feature slot WR’s and Romello Brinson when they weren’t running the ball. Similar prospect to current Miami Hurricane Larry Hodges, lacks the height and length to play the Y-TE role and will be utilized as an F-TE almost exclusively. No standout skill, as while his top-end speed is very good, it takes him a while to get there and he isn’t especially agile or athletic. Also tends to fade away from the catch point rather than snatch the ball away from defenders.

17. Malik Curtis- CB, 5-11, 160, Bishop Verot (Ft. Myers, FL) #895 (3-star)

Linear Speed- 7, Agility- 8, Frame- 5, Potential- 6

Strengths: Two-way prospect with excellent ball skills, most see him as a better prospect on the offensive side of the ball. Outstanding ball skills, can track the ball and contort his body to make difficult catches. Extremely agile has the ability to make cuts at full-speed which makes it seem like defenders with an angle can’t tackle him. Return ability gives him the chance to play early.

Opportunities: Is essentially starting over at the CB position. Limited tape at the position makes him a projection and to play CB in a defense like Miami requires an ability to tackle. Miami teaches the rugby tackling technique and this is new for Curtis. Thin-framed and skinny legs will limit his ceiling.

Overall: One of the higher floors of any of the prospects due to high certainty he will contribute on special teams and has fallback of playing WR. Several prominent CB’s in college football were primarily WR’s in HS and Curtis has athletic ability to make it work. This is a developmental prospect on defense who will test the new coaching staff.

16. Ryan Rodriguez- OC, 6-3, 280, Columbus (Miami, FL) #412 (3-star)

Linear Speed- 5, Agility- 5, Frame- 6, Potential- 7

Strengths: Reviewed my list with Danny prior to releasing it and the first thing he said was, “you’re too low on Ryan Rodriguez.” My response was it’s pretty amazing that I have 16 prospects with a 7 or higher on potential. If things break right for Rodriguez he has the chance to make an All-ACC team at C. Prototype mauler, gets most out of his tools type who will fight. Biggest strength is fact that he is a finisher and his on-field temperament. There are certain players you can see they just enjoy the violence of the game and Rodriguez is one of those players. Looks for work and I didn’t watch a play where he didn’t find someone to hit. It might surprise you how many plays of OL I watch where they don’t touch a soul and that is just not my kind of lineman.

Opportunities: In comparison to other P5 OL he does not have any other standout skill. He is heavy-legged and lacks the foot-speed to get to the outside shoulder of a 3-tech on a reach block. Lacks balance and gets over his toes at the second level. Bends at the waist too much and would have more initial pop if he would bend at the knees and engage his hips more.

Overall: So why does Rodriguez get a 7 for potential? Because he has the ability to develop into a standout C due to his on-field temperament and finishing ability. The tools are there to unlock the balance with technique and have a reasonable facsimile of a Creed Humphrey type player. The floor is also one of the lowest in this class because I do not see a standout G at this level and his lack of foot speed limits his upside if he doesn’t improve balance. Like him, but really do not like OL on the ground.


Be on the lookout for the rest of the list as Miami has signed a number of exciting recruits in this class; many of whom will contribute depth and effective practice reps immediately.
 

Comments (62)

Im confused on Haye. You said hes built like a fire hydrant but then list his frame at a 4. Is fire hydrant a bad frame. When in think of a fire hydrant I always think of tough as nails and impossible to move.
 
Im confused on Haye. You said hes built like a fire hydrant but then list his frame at a 4. Is fire hydrant a bad frame. When in think of a fire hydrant I always think of tough as nails and impossible to move.
Fire hydrant (this is just me talking) is short, with short arms, wide frame. That frame has less physical projection or length than would be desired.

Fire hydrant has nothing to do with toughness or ability to anchor for me. In fact, Haye plays far too high, which removes his ability to anchor (impossible to move part of things).

Haye played more like Leonard Taylor (upfield 3-tech rusher) than he did a 1-tech NT on film. He has the tools to be a NT if he wants to and he did show the ability to do dirty work of a NT. It is my personal opinion that Haye was Taylor insurance that they decided to take due to attitude and performance, over another toolsier prospect who ended up leaving the class.
 
Thanks, Lance. Awesome work.

For our sake, I hope you're wrong about Troutman--we need him to be a pleasant surprise.
 
Great write up. The one thing - how do you rate brantley and 8 for linear speed but Curtis only gets a 7? Kid has near elite speed
If I am not mistaken, I think he was using the position as consideration when grading them. For instance, he thinks Brantley is ranked 8 for linear speed as a linebacker etc.
 
DTroutman - I think most people have a similar take on him. I like him. But most posters were ready to throw him out of the class if higher rated prospects wanted in. I didnt like the fact that he got ran over a few times. But like you said, he will add weight and hope that will add physicality.

Question on Haye...when you say "Fire hydrant" I had nightmares of Dequan Ivory. The DT from Central florida area we added some years ago who looked like a fire hydrant too. He was out of the program within a few years. What are the differences in your opinion that could make him a better prospect?

RR - Hes the type of kid that would be a leader and anchor on a ACC or National title team. Like Brett Romberg. Cant wait to see what he looks like in 2-3 years.

Curtis - His Linear speed being a 7 kind of considered me. Ive been hearing "Travis Benjamin" comparisons so I thought he was a easy 8 or 9 at speed wise.

Great writeup!! Cant wait for the rest!!
 
Nice work, lots of time putting this together.

Why only a 7 for Curtis linear speed? Is his highlight film deceiving? Looks to be Miami’s fastest commit
Verified track times from his junior year are good, not elite. If you put an 8 on them I wouldn’t be up-in-arms.

Keep in mind this is compared to other P5 CB’s, and I’ve got him solidly above average.

Curtis or Brashard is our fastest recruit regardless of position.
 
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The number is relative to their position. While I still think Curtis deserves an 8 or higher, he’s not saying Brantley is faster than Curtis.

Lance also said he only watched one game of each so who knows if it’s their best or worst.
To be fair, I watched at least one “full” game.
 
The number is relative to their position. While I still think Curtis deserves an 8 or higher, he’s not saying Brantley is faster than Curtis.

Lance also said he only watched one game of each so who knows if it’s their best or worst.

Yeah I figured as much but Curtis (I thought) had 10.4 type speed.
 
@Lance Roffers

question I thought of while reading your Deshawn Troutman bit (and it’s probably for another time) … when you look at a linebacker like Clemson’s Skalski, how would you have scored him after his senior year of high school? (Troutman is about .1 higher than Skalski)
 
Great Writeup. On Troutman you put the same thing twice. I thought I was trippin like didn’t I just read these exact words.
 

2022 Commits

DT
6'3"
260
Tampa, FL
DE
6'2"
240
Hollywood, FL

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